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Althea Gibson statue planned for U.S. Open

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NEW YORK — The United States Tennis Association will honor Althea Gibson with a statue at the U.S. Open.

The first African-American to win the U.S. Nationals singles title in 1957 will be commemorated at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

The U.S. Nationals were the precursor to the U.S. Open. She won both the U.S. Nationals and Wimbledon titles in 1957 and 1958.

In a statement, USTA president Katrina Adams calls Gibson, who also won the 1956 French Open, the “Jackie Robinson of tennis.”

King says the 11-time Grand Slam winner is “an American treasure” who “opened the doors for future generations.”

A statue of Arthur Ashe was unveiled at the U.S. Open in 2000. The USTA has not yet selected a sculptor for the statue of Gibson, who died in 2003 at age 76.

US Open adding night sessions in new Louis Armstrong Stadium

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WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. (AP) The U.S. Open’s new, 14,000-seat Louis Armstrong Stadium will have dedicated night sessions in 2018.

The U.S. Tennis Association announced Tuesday it is making changes to the schedule for its Grand Slam tournament.

This is the first time the U.S. Open will have two arenas with double sessions. Through last year, only Arthur Ashe Stadium had separate day and night programs.

Another switch is that Ashe now will have only two matches scheduled during each day session, instead of three. Those day sessions will begin at noon instead of 11 a.m.

In Armstrong, a three-match session will start at 11 a.m. for the first nine days of the tournament. Half that stadium’s seats will be reserved, the other half general admission.

Ashe and Armstrong both have a retractable roof.

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Keys routs Vandeweghe to reach U.S. Open final

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NEW YORK — Madison Keys dominated CoCo Vandeweghe 6-1, 6-2 to reach her first Grand Slam final.

The No. 15 seed will face unseeded Sloane Stephens on Saturday in the first U.S. Open final between American players since Serena Williams beat Venus Williams in 2002.

Keys had no problem with the No. 20 seed Vandeweghe or with an upper right leg injury that caused her to call the trainer to be taped midway through the second set.