Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong still heartbroken after leaving the Livestrong Foundation

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Lance Armstrong created Livestrong in 1996 and was directly involved with the foundation until 2012 when he resigned as chairman amidst the controversy surrounding his cycling career.

“It didn’t feel good,” said Armstrong, who had seven Tour de France titles stripped in 2012. “Livestrong was a force and we affected great change.”

Livestrong fights for those who are diagnosed, or have survived cancer by providing direct services to anyone affected, and calls on state, national, and world leaders to take action and join the fight.

Even though Armstrong is no longer the Livestrong Chairman, he knows that his name will always be connected to the foundation.

“We can’t separate,” said Armstrong. “As long as your color is yellow, your name is Livestrong, your work is cancer, and you raise money through bike rides, you will never separate. I’ll say one word and tell me what comes to mind. Livestrong. (Tirico points at Armstrong) It breaks my heart.”

You can watch the entire “Lance Armstrong: Next Stage” special here or the video embedded above.

What’s next for Lance Armstrong?

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Cycling and the Tour de France still hold a place in Lance Armstrong’s life. In an interview with Mike Tirico, Armstrong opened up about his continued connection with the sport, years after his cycling days came to an end.

He currently runs two podcasts; The Move, which covers the Tour de France, cycling, and other endurance sports, and The Forward, which is more of a conversational podcast that discusses anything from politics to art to just life in general. Armstrong has had guests such as Charles Barkley and Dale Earnhardt Jr. on the Forward.

“I really believe that they would answer my questions differently than other people, because they see a guy across the table, they know he’s been nuked,” said Armstrong when discussing his guests. “They feel a sense of protection, that I can almost tell this guy anything because he’s been through everything.”

Armstrong still watches the sport as a fan. “I love watching it. I watch it as a fan. I watch it as an analyst,” said Armstrong.

When asked about what is next for him, Armstrong brought up his venture capital fund, Next Ventures, which, according to the firm’s website, “is a new venture capital firm designed to maximize growth opportunities in the exploding sports, fitness, nutrition and wellness markets.”

Although Armstrong is running podcasts and leading a venture capital firm, the most important thing in Armstrong’s life right now is his family, specifically his five children. “It’s the most important thing,” said Armstrong. “It falls on me.”

You can watch the entire “Lance Armstrong: Next Stage” special here or the video embedded above.

How Lance Armstrong’s story of ‘survivor to victor’ came crashing down

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At 25, Lance Armstrong was a patient with Stage 3 testicular cancer, tumors in his lungs, and lesions on his brain.

Three years later, he went from survivor to victor, in what was called at the time one of the most unbelievable comebacks in sports history.

For seven straight years, he dominated the Tour de France, arguably the hardest sporting event in the world, while growing an empire that included a powerful foundation dedicated to fighting cancer.

After a lengthy investigation and sanctions, Armstrong was banned from cycling in 2012. His brand imploded while his legacy as a cancer survivor and activist was polluted, and the scandal became one of the most infamous in sports history.

“If I just doped and didn’t say a thing, none of that would have happened. None of it,” Armstrong tells Mike Tirico. “You’re asking me about what I think the 1999 Tour meant to cancer survivors and the cancer community. Five years ago my answer was ‘What the hell’s the problem? Just get over it. Look at all the good I did.’ But as I sit here today, you can’t just get over it. It’s a big story.”

You can watch the entire “Lance Armstrong: Next Stage” special here or the video embedded above.