Graham O'Dwyer

Lance Armstrong still heartbroken after leaving the Livestrong Foundation

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Lance Armstrong created Livestrong in 1996 and was directly involved with the foundation until 2012 when he resigned as chairman amidst the controversy surrounding his cycling career.

“It didn’t feel good,” said Armstrong, who had seven Tour de France titles stripped in 2012. “Livestrong was a force and we affected great change.”

Livestrong fights for those who are diagnosed, or have survived cancer by providing direct services to anyone affected, and calls on state, national, and world leaders to take action and join the fight.

Even though Armstrong is no longer the Livestrong Chairman, he knows that his name will always be connected to the foundation.

“We can’t separate,” said Armstrong. “As long as your color is yellow, your name is Livestrong, your work is cancer, and you raise money through bike rides, you will never separate. I’ll say one word and tell me what comes to mind. Livestrong. (Tirico points at Armstrong) It breaks my heart.”

You can watch the entire “Lance Armstrong: Next Stage” special here or the video embedded above.

What’s next for Lance Armstrong?

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Cycling and the Tour de France still hold a place in Lance Armstrong’s life. In an interview with Mike Tirico, Armstrong opened up about his continued connection with the sport, years after his cycling days came to an end.

He currently runs two podcasts; The Move, which covers the Tour de France, cycling, and other endurance sports, and The Forward, which is more of a conversational podcast that discusses anything from politics to art to just life in general. Armstrong has had guests such as Charles Barkley and Dale Earnhardt Jr. on the Forward.

“I really believe that they would answer my questions differently than other people, because they see a guy across the table, they know he’s been nuked,” said Armstrong when discussing his guests. “They feel a sense of protection, that I can almost tell this guy anything because he’s been through everything.”

Armstrong still watches the sport as a fan. “I love watching it. I watch it as a fan. I watch it as an analyst,” said Armstrong.

When asked about what is next for him, Armstrong brought up his venture capital fund, Next Ventures, which, according to the firm’s website, “is a new venture capital firm designed to maximize growth opportunities in the exploding sports, fitness, nutrition and wellness markets.”

Although Armstrong is running podcasts and leading a venture capital firm, the most important thing in Armstrong’s life right now is his family, specifically his five children. “It’s the most important thing,” said Armstrong. “It falls on me.”

You can watch the entire “Lance Armstrong: Next Stage” special here or the video embedded above.

Country House pays $132.40 to win at Kentucky Derby

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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Country House’s stunning victory in the 145th running of the Kentucky Derby paid off big.

Stewards awarded the 65-1 long shot the victory following an objection that Maximum Security, the first horse to cross the finish line, interfered with the path of several horses.

Country House, with Flavien Prat aboard, covered the muddy 1¼ miles in 2:03.93 and paid $132.40, $56.60 and $24.60. The $132.40 to win was the second-highest payout in Derby history.

Code of Honor returned $15.20 and $9.80 for second while Tacitus paid $5.60 for third.

The victory was only the second in seven career starts for Country House. His initial win came by 3½ lengths at 1 1/16 mile on Jan. 17 at Gulfstream Park.