Tour de France 2020 schedule: Highlights, winner video, route, Stage 21 live stream, TV channel, how to watch, dates

3 Comments

The 2020 Tour de France begins on Saturday, August 29 through September 20. The three-week long cycling event was originally scheduled to take place from June 27 to July 19 but was postponed because of the pandemic. This year marks the 107th edition of the event and the first time since the end of World War II that the race is not taking place in July.  The 2020 Tour also features 12 new sites and stage cities indicated with an asterisk in the list for the 2020 Tour de France schedule below.

2020 Tour de France Key Information

When is the 2020 Tour de France? What time does coverage start?

The 2020 Tour de France will take place from Aug. 29-Sept. 20. Coverage of Stage 21 starts at 9:00 a.m. ET on NBCSN and 9:35 a.m. ET on NBC Sports Gold. Click here for start times for the rest of the 2020 Tour de France.

How do I watch the tour?

Fans can watch the entire event on NBC Sports Gold (more info here), which lets you see every stage live, ad-free and on-demand. Subscribers also can access interactive maps and get exclusive live streams of alternate camera angles. The event also can be seen on NBCSN. Click here for a full live stream and TV schedule. Plus, check back for extended highlights of every stage here and on NBCSports.com.

Peacock Premium, available for $4.99 per month, will also provide live streaming coverage of every stage of the 2020 Tour de France.

How long is the event?

The 2020 Tour de France is 23 days long.  There will be one stage contested per day and two rest days. The first rest day is on September 7 (between stages 9 & 10) and the second will be on September 14 (between stages 15 & 16).

How many riders?

There will be a total of 176 riders. There will be 22 teams with 8 riders per team.

How many stages?

There are 21 stages: 9 flat, 3 hilly, 8 mountain stages, and 1 individual time trial.

What is the 2020 Tour de France schedule and route?

Stage Date Start Finish Distance Terrain
1 August 29 Nice Moyen Pays Nice 156 km Flat
2 August 30 Nice Haut Pays Nice 187 km Mountain
3 August 31 Nice Sisteron 198 km Flat
4 September 1 Sisteron Orcières-Merlette 157 km Hilly
5 September 2 Gap Privas 183 km Flat
6 September 3 Le Teil* Mont Aigoual* 191 km Hilly
7 September 4 Millau Lavaur 168 km Hilly
8 September 5 Cazères-sur-Garonne* Loudenvielle 140 km Mountain
9 September 6 Pau Laruns 154 km Mountain

September 7 – Rest Day

10 September 8 The Chateau d’Oleron Ile de Re Saint-Martin-de-Re* 170 km Flat
11 September 9 Châtelaillon-Plage* Poitiers 167 km Flat
12 September 10 Chauvigny* Sarran Corrèze 218 km Hilly
13 September 11 Châtel-Guyon* Puy Mary Cantal* 191 km Mountain
14 September 12 Clermont-Ferrand Lyon 197 km Flat
15 September 13 Lyon Grand Colombier* 175 km Mountain

September 14 – Rest Day

16 September 15 La Tour-du-Pin Villard-de-Lans 164 km Mountain
17 September 16 Grenoble Col de la Loze 168 km Mountain
18 September 17 Méribel La-Roche-sur-Foron* 168 km Mountain
19 September 18 Bourg-en-Bresse Champagnole 160 km Flat
20 September 19 Lure* Planche de Belles Filles 36 km Time Trial
21 September 20 Mantes-la-Jolie* Paris (Champs- Élysées) 122 km Flat

Click here to see the full map

How many miles is the 2020 Tour de France?

The route is 3,484 km (2,165 mi) long.

Previous Winners

2019 – Egan Bernal

2018 – Geraint Thomas

2017 – Chris Froome

2016 – Chris Froome

2015 – Chris Froome

2014 – Vincenzo Nibali

2013 – Chris Froome

2012 – Bradley Wiggins

2011 – Cadel Evans

2010 – Andy Schleck

Davide Rebellin dies after hit by truck while training

Getty Images
3 Comments

MILAN — Italian cyclist Davide Rebellin, one of the sport’s longest-serving professionals, died after being struck by a truck while training. He was 51.

Rebellin was riding near the town of Montebello Vicentino in northern Italy when he was hit by a truck near a motorway junction. The vehicle did not stop, although Italian media reported that the driver may have been unaware of the collision.

Local police are working to reconstruct the incident and find the driver.

Rebellin had only retired from professional cycling last month, bringing to an end a career that had spanned 30 years. He last competed for Work Service-Vitalcare-Dynatek and the UCI Continental team posted a tribute on its social media accounts.

“Dear Davide, keep pedaling, with the same smile, the same enthusiasm and the same passion as always,” the Italian team said. “This is not how we imagined the future together and it is not fair to have to surrender so suddenly to your tragic absence.”

“To your family, your loved ones, your friends and all the enthusiasts who, like us, are crying for you right now, we just want to say that we imagine you on a bicycle, looking for new roads, new climbs and new challenges even up there, in the sky.”

Rebellin’s successes included victories at Paris-Nice and Tirreno-Adriatico as well as winning a stage in the 1996 edition of the Giro d’Italia, which he also led for six stages.

Rebellin won silver in the road race at the 2008 Olympic Games, but he was later stripped of his medal and banned for two years after a positive doping test. He had denied wrongdoing.

CAS upholds Nairo Quintana DQ from Tour de France for opioid use

Getty Images
17 Comments

LAUSANNE, Switzerland – The disqualification of two-time Tour de France runner-up Nairo Quintana from his sixth place in the 2022 race for misuse of an opioid was confirmed by the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

CAS said its judges dismissed Quintana’s appeal and agreed with the International Cycling Union that the case was a medical matter rather than a doping rules violation. He will not be banned.

The court said the judges ruled “the UCI’s in-competition ban on tramadol was for medical rather than doping reasons and was therefore within the UCI’s power and jurisdiction.”

Traces of the synthetic painkiller tramadol were found in two dried blood spot samples taken from the Colombian racer five days apart in July, the UCI previously said.

Quintana’s case is among the first to rely on the dried blood spot (DBS) method of collecting samples which the World Anti-Doping Agency approved last year.

Tramadol was banned in 2019 from use at cycling races because of potential side effects. They include the risk of addiction, dizziness, drowsiness and loss of attention.

Quintana finished second in the Tour de France in 2013 and 2015, won both times by Chris Froome. He won the 2014 Giro d’Italia.