AP Images

Yates maintains Giro lead, Dennis wins 16th stage time trial

Leave a comment

ROVERETO, Italy – Simon Yates is still in control of the Giro d’Italia after the British rider limited his losses to closest rival Tom Dumoulin in the individual time trial on Tuesday.

Dumoulin was more than two minutes behind Yates heading into the 16th stage and, as a time trial specialist, it was seen as his best chance of taking the pink jersey from the Mitchelton-Scott cyclist.

However, Yates still leads Dumoulin by 56 seconds heading into the final five stages.

“I’m really happy,” Yates said shortly after crossing the line. “I really gave everything there. I was dying in the final 10 kilometers. I thought I would lose a lot more. I’m really happy. I’m really surprised I’ve kept the jersey, I’ll be honest.”

Domenico Pozzovivo remained third but slipped 3:11 behind Yates.

Rohan Dennis of Australia won the 34-kilometer (21-mile) time trial from Trento to Rovereto, beating Tony Martin by 14 seconds. Dumoulin was third, 22 seconds behind the BMC Racing Team cyclist.

“I had a good TT but Rohan Dennis and Tony Martin were better,” said Dumoulin, who rides for Team Sunweb. “I wasn’t strong enough. Yates also had a very good day so all in all it’s disappointing for us but it is what it is. I gave everything today … I’m keeping my head up and we’ll fight until Rome.”

Dennis had lost the opening time trial in Israel by two seconds to Dumoulin.

“It’s pretty good to beat time-trialists like Tony Martin and Tom Dumoulin,” Dennis said. “I came to the Giro to win a stage. I was hoping for Jerusalem to be that one. This stage was a big target for me as well. To win here and jump back in the top 10 is a big day for me.”

Chris Froome finished fifth, 35 seconds behind Dennis, to move into fourth overall. The four-time Tour de France champion is 3:50 behind Yates but only 39 seconds behind Pozzovivo and a spot on the podium.

Froome arrived at the Giro bidding to become the third person to win three Grand Tours in a row but he crashed in training before the opening time trial, lost time in a split on stage four and injured himself again in a second crash four days later.

“I gave everything on the road today,” Froome said in Italian. “I’m happy because I think I jumped a few places in the standings. For the (general classification), it will be difficult. I’m far from Yates and he’s been very, very strong until now. I feel better every day. My legs are better especially after yesterday’s rest day. It’s not over yet. I’ll give everything and we’ll see whether I’ll finish third or fifth or wherever.”

The 17th stage on Wednesday is a hilly 155-kilometer ride from Riva del Garda to Iseo, through the wine region of Franciacorta, before three grueling days in the Alps.

Yates’ three stage wins have come on uphill finishes after thrilling attacks.

“There are still some difficult stages to come, I’ll look to defend now, unfortunately for the fans,” said Yates. “I hope I don’t have some bad days, something disastrous happens or anything and I hope to wear it into Rome.”

The Giro ends in Rome on Sunday.

Andre Cardoso banned four years for doping

Getty Images
Leave a comment

AIGLE, Switzerland — The International Cycling Union says it imposed a four-year ban on Portuguese rider Andre Cardoso for doping with EPO ahead of the 2017 Tour de France.

The UCI says its anti-doping tribunal gave its verdict, in a case opened almost 17 months ago.

Cardoso tested positive for the endurance boosting hormone two weeks before the Tour.

He was suspended by Trek-Segafredo, which selected Cardoso as a specialist climber to support team leader Alberto Contador.

The 34-year-old Cardoso had career top-20 finishes in the Giro d’Italia and Spanish Vuelta, and competed in the road races at the 2008 Beijing Olympics and 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics.

Pro riders union upset by doping control during cycling gala

Getty Images
Leave a comment

PARIS — The professional cyclists’ union is urging anti-doping authorities to treat athletes in a more respectful manner after a Belgian rider was forced to leave a cycling gala to follow anti-doping inspectors for an out-of-competition test.

Pieter Serry, who rides for the Quick Step team, missed the Gala of the Flandrien on Tuesday after doping inspectors came to the ceremony to take samples.

In a statement published Wednesday, the riders’ association (CPA) complained about “another case of non-respect for the privacy of the riders” and criticized the odd timing of some doping controls.

“There have been cases reported where the riders were checked on their wedding day, during a funeral or on their child’s first day of school,” said Gianni Bugno, the president of the CPA. “Now we read about the case of Pieter Serry, controlled in the offseason, out of the hour scheduled, while at the Flemish cycling festival. … The riders pay 2 percent of their prizes to make these controls possible, they are the only athletes in the world who pay the anti-doping from their own pockets,” Bugno said. “The riders respect the measures required for the fight against doping, but at least they ask for the respect of their private life in return.”

Belgian media quoted Serry as saying he had already been tested two weeks ago and told antidoping authorities he was available from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. at his home.

“I understand that there must be checks and that people have to do their work, but two checks immediately after each other, out of season, is simply a waste of money. I feel like a prisoner with an ankle monitor,” Serry was quoted as saying.

The CPA added it will try to find out whether it was the Belgian anti-doping agency, the national cycling federation or Cycling’s anti-doping foundation (CADF) which ordered Serry’s test.

“In addition, the CPA will present an official request to all the bodies involved in the fight against doping and the UCI to establish a code of conduct for the controllers, to ensure the respect for the private life of the athletes, at least in certain circumstances,” the CPA said.