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Mike from Montclair on Chris Christie: It was like a boxing match

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New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s audition for Mike Francesa’s spot on WFAN was a roller coaster Monday, featuring the Knicks, the Yankees and a little bit of politics.

After listening to Christie, longtime caller Mike Goldstein, better known as Mike from Montclair, had enough sports talk. He picked up the phone, dialed the radio station and informed the call-screener he wanted to talk about Aaron Judge and the Yankees.

In reality, Goldstein intended to respectfully confront the governor about utilizing the governor’s mansion on Island Beach State Park over July 4th, but Christie’s response to another caller sparked Mike’s outrage.

“That’s good,” Christie said to caller named John from Montclair after he said that the governor had done a horrible job. “You lost twice, John. That shows how much you matter. You went 0-2.”

“I really want to emphasize this: He tried to embarrass the guy before me. And I was not going to let that happen to me,” Goldstein told NBC Sports Tuesday. “I was going to fight fire with fire.”

Here is what Goldstein said to the governor:

“Governor, next time you want to sit on a beach that is closed to the entire world except you, you put your fat ass in a car and go to one that’s open to all your constituents, not just you and yours.”

“It’s like being in a boxing match and I stunned him. Once he got his footing back, I knew he would come back at me. It went exactly as I expected it to go. I didn’t expect him to call me a communist… I definitely jarred him.”

The Governor’s office did not respond to a request for comment.

Goldstein, who has been a Montclair resident for nearly 30 years, said the only thing that really surprised him was that Christie essentially called Montclair a communist town.

“Let’s be honest, you don’t get a chance very often, if ever, to go call him out. (Christie) controls everything at these town halls and it’s not often that John Q. Public can stand toe-to-toe with him and call him out to his face, so when you have the opportunity to do it, which I had yesterday, I took it.

“People are so polarized about politics. They feel so strongly about them and have strong opinions. It’s more emotional than it used to be. It’s like a lightning rod. When you can challenge a politician and call him out, I think people like that.”

While a lot of people have strong feelings about politics, Goldstein says that sports-talk radio is fun to him.

“I’m happy that he came back at me. That’s what makes talk radio fun. That’s what it is to men … You get into arguments, you hang up the phone and then the day goes on.”

Alaskan Native Pete Kaiser wins Iditarod sled dog race

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ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) Pete Kaiser won the Iditarod early Wednesday, throwing his arms over his head and pumping his fists as he became the latest Alaska Native to claim victory in the iconic sled dog race.

Kaiser, 31, crossed the finish line in Nome after beating back a challenge from the defending champion, Norwegian musher Joar Ulsom.

Crowds cheered and clapped as Kaiser came off the Bering Sea ice and mushed down Nome’s main street to the famed burled arch finish line. His wife and children greeted him, hugging him at the conclusion of the 1,000-mile (1,600-kilometer) race, which began March 3 north of Anchorage.

Kaiser, who is Yupik, is from the southwest Alaska community of Bethel. A large contingent of Bethel residents flew to Nome to witness his victory. Alaska Native dancers and drummers performed near the finish line as they waited for Kaiser to arrive.

Kaiser will receive $50,000 and a new pickup truck for the victory. Four other Alaska Native mushers have won the race, including John Baker, an Inupiaq from Kotzebue, in 2011.

This year’s race was marked by the stunning collapse of Frenchman Nicolas Petit, who was seemingly headed for victory as late as Monday.

Petit, a native of France living in Alaska, had a five-hour lead and was cruising until his dog team stopped running between the Shaktoolik and Koyuk checkpoints.

Petit said one dog was picking on another during a rest break, and he yelled at the dog to knock it off. At that point, the entire team refused to run.

Petit had to withdraw, and the dog team had to be taken back to the previous checkpoint by snowmobile.

Fifty-two mushers began the race in Willow. Petit was among 10 racers who withdrew during the race.

The race took mushers and their dog teams over two mountain ranges, along the frozen Yukon River and then across the treacherous, wind-swept Bering Sea coast to the finish line in Nome.

This year’s race came during a bruising two-year stretch for the Iditarod that included a dog doping scandal and the loss of national sponsors amid protests by animal rights activists.

French musher was leading Iditarod, but then his dogs quit

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ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) Musher Nicolas Petit lost a huge lead in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race on Monday when his dog team refused to keep going after he yelled at one of the animals.

A dog named Joey had been fighting with another dog on the team and jumped it during a break on the way to the Bering Sea checkpoint of Koyuk.

“I yelled at Joey, and everybody heard the yelling, and that doesn’t happen,” Petit told the Iditarod Insider website. “And then they wouldn’t go anymore. Anywhere. So we camped here.”

Several mushers passed Petit’s team on the trail, erasing his five-hour lead in the race. Pete Kaiser of Alaska was the first musher into Koyuk, followed 11 minutes later by defending champion Joar Ulsom of Norway.

The checkpoint is 827 miles (1,330 kilometers) into the 1,000-mile (1,600-kilometer) race across Alaska.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, a frequent critic of the race, didn’t immediately return a message seeking comment Monday.

Petit said his dogs are well-fed and there’s no medical issue keeping them from getting up and running.

“It’s just a head thing,” he said. “We’ll see if one of these dog teams coming by will wake them up at all.”

For Petit, it’s another bad memory from the stretch between the Shaktoolik and Koyuk checkpoints.

He was in command of last year’s race when he got off trail during a blizzard and lost the lead. He wound up finishing second behind Ulsom.

“Something about right here, huh?” he mused.

The race started March 2 in Willow, just north of Anchorage. The course through the Alaska wilderness took mushers over two mountain ranges and the frozen Yukon River before they reached the treacherous Bering Sea coast.

The winner is expected to come off the sea ice and mush down Nome’s main street to the finish line sometime in the middle of the week.