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Lindsey Vonn pulls out of Sunday’s World Cup race

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CRANS MONTANA, Switzerland — Lindsey Vonn has pulled out of the World Cup Alpine combined race on Sunday, completing a miserable weekend in Crans Montana for the American skier.

Vonn crashed in the super-G on Saturday, although after an anxious wait she was able to ski down the course.

The former Olympic champion also withdrew from another combined race on Friday, along with overall World Cup leader Mikaela Shiffrin and their American teammate Laurenne Ross, because of dangerous conditions on the course. In posts on social media that night she said she had food poisoning, and the next morning had not fully recovered but would race.

Late Saturday she wrote on Twitter: “Unfortunately after getting food poisoning and crashing today I don’t feel healthy enough to safely race tomorrow so I will not be starting.”

Vonn pulled out of Friday’s race after the first three competitors crashed, and one was taken away on a stretcher with a knee injury.

The event was postponed and the start was lowered but Vonn didn’t want to risk herself, and criticized organizers for not cancelling the race.

Vonn returned to competition only last month after nearly a year out with knee and arm injuries.

The announcement of her name on Saturday as she prepared to start the super-G prompted a smattering of boos among spectators. There were loud gasps when she lost control and fell, sliding several feet before crashing into the safety netting.

There was a worrying few minutes as Vonn remained down. Other competitors were clearly concerned for her. However, the four-time World Cup overall champion was able to ski down to the finish area, where she was greeted with loud cheers.

Vonn was visibly upset and appeared to be crying as she was comforted by teammate Julia Mancuso.

US Olympic cyclist Catlin found dead in her home at age 23

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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) Olympic track cyclist Kelly Catlin, who helped the U.S. women’s pursuit team win the silver medal at the Rio de Janeiro Games in 2016, died Friday at her home in California. She was 23.

USA Cycling chief executive Rob DeMartini said in a statement Sunday that “the entire cycling community is mourning this immense loss. We are offering continuous support to Kelly’s teammates, coaches and staff. We also encourage all those who knew Kelly to support each other through the grieving.”

Catlin’s father, Mark Catlin, told VeloNews that his daughter killed herself.

Catlin was born and raised near Minneapolis, Minnesota, and rose to prominence on the track as a member of the U.S. national team. She also raced on the road for the Rally UHC Pro Cycling Team, and she was pursuing a graduate degree in computational mathematics at Stanford.

Don’t expect to puff away at next year’s Tokyo Olympics

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TOKYO (AP) — Tokyo is still a smoker’s heaven.

Despite tougher laws enacted last year, smokers can light up in some restaurants and bars. Tobacco advertising is allowed on television, cigarette packages don’t contain graphic health warnings, and tobacco is cheap compared to other major cities.

However, don’t expect to puff away at next year’s Tokyo Olympics.

Organizers on Thursday announced a stringent ban on all tobacco products and vaping devices. Smoking will be banned at all indoor and outdoor Olympic and Paralympic venues, plus within all perimeter areas of the Tokyo Games.

Organizers say the prohibition is tougher than regulations for the last two Summer Olympics in London and Rio de Janeiro.

“Tokyo 2020 aims to leave a legacy of improved health for the country at large,” organizers said in a statement.

Japan’s national legislature last year approved a ban on smoking inside public facilities, but the measure was seen as weak and excluded many bars and restaurants.

Tokyo’s city government separately enacted tougher rules last year to protect from second-hand smoke. All provisions kick in during the run-up to the Olympics.

Smoking is still allowed in small eateries and bars. They make up half of Japanese establishments, where it’s common to see a customer eating with chopsticks in one hand and a cigarette in the other.

“Countering passive smoking has long been a concern,” Keiko Nakayama, a Tokyo city government health official, said in a statement to The Associated Press. “We would like to push for approving more anti-smoking measures so people stay healthy longer.”

The city’s smoking policy will be reviewed in five years. But more regulation will always face tough opposition despite the fact that smoking has declined in recent years.

The Japanese government has a large stake in tobacco. It owns a third of the stock and is the top investor in major cigarette company Japan Tobacco Inc. The industry was a government monopoly until 1985, and is a huge source of tax revenue.

Smoking is cheap in Japan compared to other developed countries. A pack of Marlboro cigarettes costs about $5. In London and New York it’s about $14, and in Sydney it’s $20.

According to World Health Organization data for 2015, 32.7 percent of Japanese males smoke, compared to 24.4 in the United States. The highest figures were East Timor (78.0) and Indonesia (74.9), and the lowest two were in Africa: Ethiopia (7.6) and Ghana (7.1).