Key stages on the 2017 Tour de France route

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PARIS (AP) With 21 stages, 23 tough climbs in five mountain ranges, three mountain-top finishes and two time trials, the route for the 2017 Tour de France, unveiled Tuesday in Paris, promises an array of challenges for the wide variety of skill sets in the professional cycling peloton.

Here is a quick look at what to look forward to at the 104th edition of cycling’s greatest race:

OFF WITH A BANG: At just 13 kilometers (8 miles), the opening time trial on Day One in Duesseldorf, Germany, is short enough for a good number of riders to harbor ambitions of winning it and becoming the first wearer of the race leader’s iconic yellow jersey – a guaranteed highlight of any rider’s career.

It also isn’t long enough for riders who are strong against the clock, like defending champion Chris Froome, to open up big gaps over weaker time trialers like key rival Nairo Quintana.

That is good for fans, because it will mean the race isn’t decided early on, but perhaps not so good for riders. With most of them still in contention after the time trial and full of nervous energy, they will race hell for leather over the next three flattish stages, increasing the likelihood of crashes that could take out top contenders.

SPRINTERS SHINE: Sprinters like Mark Cavendish, who can hit speeds of 70 kilometers per hour (40 miles per hour) over short distances, will be looking for victories on the stages between Duesseldorf and Day 5, when the Tour veers sharply uphill in the Vosges – spiky, hilly terrain where bulkier, muscly sprinters struggle. They will get more opportunities for victories in Burgundy wine country at the end of week one, in week two before the Pyrenees and, of course, on the cobblestones of the Champs-Elysees boulevard at the end of the final stage in Paris on July 23.

OUCH, THIS HURTS: In their perpetual quest to innovate at the 113-year-old race, Tour organizers have slightly cut down on the quantity of climbs in 2017 but ratcheted up their steepness. Six particularly steep ascents stand out, starting with 20-percent gradients up to the Planche des Belles Filles ski station in the Vosges in eastern France. Froome won the stage there in 2012. The Col du Grand Colombier, in the Jura mountains on stage nine, has the sharpest gradients next year – 22 percent, steep enough to burn out the clutches of reporters who follow the race by car if they’re not careful.

Also in the Jura are the 15-percent gradients of the Mont du Chat, last climbed by the Tour in 1974.

“One of the hardest climbs in France,” says Tour director Christian Prudhomme.

Other gradients of note are 16-percent slopes to the Peyragudes ski station and 18-percent stretches on the Mur de Peguere, both in the Pyrenees, and a 14-percent section on the Col de Peyra Taillade, on stage 15 in the Massif Central.

QUEEN STAGE: Every Tour has a stage that stands out for its difficulty and the drama that is expected to generate, the so-called “Queen stage.” Next year that appears to be the unprecedented mountain-top finish at the Col d’Izoard in the Alps. The lunar and hostile terrain of sun- and snow-scorched rocks and the thinning mountain air on the long climb to an altitude of 2,360 meters (7,742 feet) could make the Izoard, at the end of stage 18, the last big battleground among surviving contenders for the winner’s check of 500,000 euros ($550,000).

LAST BUT NOT LEAST: The 23-kilometer (14-mile) time trial in the Mediterranean port city of Marseille on the penultimate stage 20 should settle overall rider placings before the largely ceremonial final ride into Paris the next day. The clock-race will start and finish in the Velodrome Stadium that is home to the city’s football team, and will scoot through the Old Port, with a short climb to the white basilica that overlooks France’s second-largest city.

Australia’s Jay Vine wins Tour Down Under

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ADELAIDE, Australia — Australia’s Jay Vine defended his overnight lead to win the Tour Down Under, the first event of the 2023 World Tour.

Simon Yates of Britain won the final stage and moved up from third to second place on overall standings. Vine came in second on the stage to secure the biggest win of his career in a stage race.

The UAE Team Emirates rider took the overall tour lead when he finished second in Stage 2 and third in Stage 3. He came into the final stage with a 15-second lead on general classification.

The 70-mile stage involved four laps of a 15.5 mile-circuit through the Adelaide Hills before finishing just beyond the summit of Mount Lofty.

Yates led the crucial attack on the ascent less than 1.2 miles from the finish, but Vine jumped onto his wheel and Australian Ben O’Connor also joined in.

O’Connor led out close to the finish line, Vine briefly passed him but Yates came over the top to claim the stage win. Vine retained his overall advantage and claimed the title in his debut appearance in the Tour Down Under.

The 27-year-old made his name in e-Sports before being signed by the UAE team after winning the academy program on the Zwift online platform. He won two stages of the Vuelta a Espana last year and the Australian Time Trial title.

“It’s pretty incredible to be standing here and wearing this jersey,” Vine said. “The way we drove that was first class. My guys were incredible.”

The final stage featured a breakaway of 13 riders but Vine’s UAE teammates led the chase by the peloton and put their rider in a position to contest the win.

Yates again rode an aggressive race but had to be happy with the stage win.

“We came Down Under with a lot of ambition. We put a lot into it and we didn’t come away with the overall but we can walk away pretty happy,” Yates said. “Obviously Jay Vine is a massive talent and the crowd will be happy with a local winner.”

France’s Coquard wins Tour Down Under Stage 4; Vine leads

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ADELAIDE, Australia — French cyclist Bryan Coquard won Stage 4 of the Tour Down Under for his first-ever World Tour win, while Australia’s Jay Vine retained the overall tour lead by 15 seconds with one stage remaining.

Coquard is a lightweight sprinter who has had 49 wins in a decade-long career but had never won on the World Tour until he cleared out near the finish to claim the 82-mile stage by a margin of about just over 100 feet.

Vine was among the leading group that shared Coquard’s winning time and who retained his lead on general classification over Britain’s Simon Yates and Germany’s Phil Bauhaus. The race concludes with Stage 5, which ends atop 2,329-foot Mount Lofty.

“It’s a long time that I’ve waited for this win, 10 years,” said Coquard, who rides for the French Cofidis team. “I never really expected and I’m very happy and relieved with this win.”

While the stage was flat and suited sprinters, it had its challenges. Cross-winds and occasional gradients made the stage difficult and confounded some riders.

After an early breakaway by Jonas Rutsch and former tour winner Daryl Impey of South Africa, the peloton broke into two groups with Vine and other tour leaders among the leading group.

The leading group stayed together around the last, sharp bend towards the finish and Coquard bided his time until his late sprint left other riders flat-footed.

“It was pretty stressful,” Vine said. “There was one point there, I thought we were going to have an easy day and I was happy, smiling, waving to families on the side of the road.

“Then, 45 kilometers in it was on and it was on until the end so it was a very hard day. There was a lot more calorie expenditure than I was planning.”