Peter Sagan claims Tour de France yellow jersey after Stage 2 win

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CHERBOURG-EN-COTENTIN, France — World champion Peter Sagan made the most of a steep, short climb in a frenzied finale to win the second stage of the Tour de France and claim the race leader’s yellow jersey on Sunday.

Sagan, who pulled on the coveted shirt for the first time, used his power on the 1.9-kilometer Cote de la Glacerie leading to the finish line to claim the win.

Frenchman Julian Alaphilippe, who started the final sprint, was second in the 183-kilometer stage between Saint-Lo and Cherbourg-en-Cotentin in Normandy, with Spaniard Alejandro Valverde in third place.

A debutant at the Tour, Alaphilippe made his move on the left side of the road. Sagan waited patiently in his wake before timing his acceleration to perfection to overtake the Frenchman and win by a bike’s length.

“I’m very surprised I won because I was thinking there were still two guys in front,” said Sagan, who did not celebrate as he crossed the line. “The team today made a very big job. Roman Kreuziger did the last climb full gas and in the final I did my best — for third place… It’s unbelievable. I’m already wearing a very nice jersey, but yellow is something special.”

Two-time Tour de France winner Alberto Contador, who crashed for a second consecutive day, was dropped in the final climb and lost 48 seconds.

Belgian Jasper Stuyven, who was part of an early breakaway group that formed after the start of the stage, almost thwarted Sagan’s plans when he tried to go for a solo win, but was reined in with 500 meters left.

Overnight leader Mark Cavendish finished just behind BMC co-leader Richie Porte, who was among the big losers of day, crossing the finish line 1 minute and 45 seconds behind Sagan after a puncture.

Cavendish started the day with a four-second lead over Marcel Kittel, with Sagan in third place, six seconds behind. The Slovak rider now has an 8-second lead over Alaphilippe, with Valverde in third place 10 seconds back.

Chris Froome, last year’s Tour winner, is fifth overall after Sunday’s stage, 14 seconds behind Sagan.

All 198 riders took the start in Saint-Lo under grey skies but Cavendish brought a splash of color to the scene.

Wearing yellow for the first time, the Briton marked the special occasion with a customized bike featuring yellow handlebar and pedals.

Stuyven and three other riders immediately broke away from the peloton on slippery roads near the English Channel as rain started to fall. Paul Voss, Vegard Breen, Cesare Benedetti and Stuyven built a lead of about six minutes before the peloton started to pull them back.

Voss, who spent most of the opening day at the front of the race, was made to pay for his efforts and was dropped in the climb to the summit of the Cote de Montpinchon.

He managed to rejoin the leading group while a crash split the main peloton in two after 60 kilometers. Spaniard Joaquim Rodriguez and Contador, who suffered cuts and bruises on his right shoulder in a crash during Stage 1, were among the riders caught up in the incident.

Contador fell on the same shoulder and was forced to change bike. He was helped back into the pack by five Tinkoff teammates as the pace slowed down at the front.

“It’s not ideal but he’s fine,” Tinkoff sports director Sean Yates said. “It’s not good to fall two days in a row, but we hope this was the last time.”

There were some broad smiles on the riders’ faces as the sun finally broke through the clouds with 100 kilometers left, drying the roads and warming bodies in the peloton.

The pace in the bunch barely moved until 55 kilometers to go when Cavendish’s Dimension Data outfit started to push forward.

The peloton’s chase started a bit late, as the final battle shaped up with rain falling again and Stuyven almost upseting all the favorites.

“I felt a little bit empty on the steep part,” said Stuyven, who made his breakthrough last year when he won a stage at the Spanish Vuelta. “Unfortunately, I was 450 meters short.”

Demare wins crash-affected Stage 10; Conti keeps Giro lead

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MODENA, Italy (AP) Arnaud Demare of France sprinted to victory after a crash affected the end of the 10th stage of the Giro d’Italia on Tuesday, while Italian cyclist Valerio Conti kept the overall lead.

Demare, who rides for Groupama-FDJ, edged out Elia Viviani and Rudiger Selig in a bunch sprint at the end of the entirely flat 145-kilometer (90-mile) route from Ravenna to Modena.

“We came to the Giro for this. I really wanted a stage win and I got it,” Demare said. “I avoided the crash because we, as a team, were very well positioned. I’m super happy.”

A crash inside the final kilometer ended Pascal Ackermann’s chances of claiming a third stage win at this year’s Giro. The German cyclist finished the stage with his shorts and jersey in tatters.

Ackermann appeared to touch wheels with the rider in front of him, causing him to go down and taking out a number of other cyclists.

The most seriously injured was Matteo Moschetti, who briefly lost consciousness. His Trek-Segafredo teammates and other cyclists frantically waved over medics and Moschetti attempted to stand but swiftly sat down again.

The 22-year-old was taken to a hospital.

As the crash happened inside the final three kilometers there were no time gaps given. Conti remained 1 minute, 50 seconds ahead of Primoz Roglic and 2:21 ahead of Nans Peters of France.

“It wasn’t a hard day but, as everyone saw, danger is always around the corner,” Conti said. “Luckily I managed to avoid all the crashes. It went well, another day in the pink jersey is a source of pride.”

Wednesday’s 11th stage is also entirely flat along the 221-kilometer route from Carpi to Novi Ligure.

The Giro finishes in Verona on June 2.

More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP-Sports

Roglic wins Stage 9; Conti keeps pink jersey in Giro

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SAN MARINO (AP) Primoz Roglic of Slovenia won the ninth stage of the Giro d’Italia on Sunday as Italian cyclist Valerio Conti extended his overall lead after the individual time trial.

Roglic, who also won the opening individual time trial, was quickest on the rain-soaked 35-kilometer (22-mile) route from Riccione that had an uphill finish in San Marino – the only time this year that the Giro crosses into another country.

The 29-year-old Roglic was 11 seconds faster than Belgium cyclist Victor Campenaerts and one minute ahead of Bauke Mollema of the Netherlands.

Roglic had been more than five minutes behind Conti going into the time trial but moved into second overall, 1:50 behind the UAE Team Emirates cyclist, who had replaced Roglic in the overall lead after finishing second in Thursday’s sixth stage.

Moreover, Roglic gained time on his rivals. British cyclist Simon Yates – one of the pre-race favorites – finished more than three minutes behind Roglic.

“It’s a perfect performance in my mind. I did a good job,” Roglic said. “I took it easy at the beginning and I gave it all at the end.

“It’s nice to take some time over the other GC favorites but the Giro is far from over.”

Nans Peters of France moved third overall, 2:21 behind Conti.

“It was very rainy for me but I stayed calm. My goal was to keep the Maglia Rosa so I’m very happy with the result,” Conti said.

Vincenzo Nibali fared the best out of the rest of the pre-race favorites, finishing fourth on a day which saw only 12 riders finish within two minutes of the winner. The Italian is 3:34 behind Conti.

Monday is the race’s first rest day before Tuesday’s 10th stage, an entirely flat 145-kilometer route from Ravenna to Modena.

The Giro finishes in Verona on June 2.