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Boxing Hall of Fame inductees remember Ali

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CANASTOTA, N.Y. — On a day when the boxing world turned its focus to the annual Hall of Fame induction ceremony, remembering The Greatest was part of the celebration.

Following the national anthem at Sunday’s ceremony, an honorary 10-count was given in honor of the late Muhammad Ali and fellow class of 1990 inductee Bob Foster, who died last November.

“It’s been a very difficult period for me. My dear friend Muhammad Ali passed away,” said Jerry Izenberg, a longtime sports columnist for the Newark Star-Ledger and member of the class of 2016. “He was perhaps one of the greatest, if not the greatest, humanitarians I’ve ever known. I will never forget this moment. I will never forget this day.

“I don’t know that writers belong in the Hall of Fame, but I’m honored. To be here is a gift for me. It’s a marvelous gift.”

Hector Camacho, who overcame the mean streets of Spanish Harlem to become a three-division champion, was among the group enshrined Sunday in the International Boxing Hall of Fame.

Camacho, who was shot and killed just over three years ago at age 50 in his native Puerto Rico, headed a class that also included two-division champions Lupe Pintor of Mexico and Hilario Zapata of Panama.

Camacho’s son, Hector Camacho Jr., and mother, Maria Matias, accepted the honor.

“What time is it?!” Camacho Jr. asked the crowd, which roared back “Macho time!”

“On my father’s behalf, what I got to witness firsthand was, he poured his heart, blood, everything he had into the sport,” Camacho Jr. said. “A little crazy, you’ve got to admit, but he was a wonderful person and a big-hearted father.”

Inducted in the non-participant and observer categories were: Harold Lederman, a judge for over 30 years; Marc Ratner, executive director of the Nevada State Athletic Commission for 14 years; and Col. Bob Sheridan, an international television broadcaster since 1973.

Inductees were selected in December by the Boxing Writers Association and a panel of international boxing historians.

His lightning-quick hand speed, devastating combinations, and the accuracy of his punches defined Camacho inside the ropes — he won his first 38 pro fights before losing a split decision to Greg Haugen in 1991 — as did his flamboyant style. Few boxers grabbed more attention in the 1980s and 1990s. Camacho retired in 2010 with a record of 79-6-3, with 38 knockouts.

Camacho, who fought drug and alcohol problems for years, was shot in the left side of the face in November 2012 as he sat in a Ford Mustang with a friend outside a bar in his hometown. He died four days later after being taken off life support and is buried at St. Raymond’s Cemetery in the Bronx.

Pintor, the former WBC bantamweight champion from Mexico, compiled a career record of 56-14-2 with 42 knockouts. He was joined on stage by his son, Lupe Pintor Jr., who translated his speech.

“I’m really honored to represent my country, to be here today with you and to be a part of this Hall of Fame,” Pintor said.

Zapata, the former WBC and WBA flyweight champion from Panama, was born in 1958 in Panama City and began boxing as an amateur in 1974 before making his professional debut in 1977. At 5-foot-7 unusually tall for a 108-pound boxer, the southpaw retired with a pro record of 43-10-1, with 15 knockouts.

“Thank you to the Hall of Fame because God put my name in their minds to have me inducted here today on this special day,” Zapata said through a translator. “Personally, I would like to say, I didn’t fight very much here in the United States, but for those of you who followed my career, thank you, and to everyone in Panama as well.”

Canelo Alvarez inks 11-bout deal, $365 million deal with streaming service DAZN

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NEW YORK – Canelo Alvarez has signed an 11-fight deal to have his fights shown on the sports-streaming service DAZN, beginning with his next bout.

Alvarez will move up in weight to challenge WBA super middleweight champion Rocky Fielding on Dec. 15 at New York’s Madison Square Garden.

Golden Boy Promotions said Wednesday that Alvarez’s deal will be the richest athlete contract in sports history. Terms weren’t announced.

Alvarez (50-1-2, 34 KOs) is coming off s victory over Gennady Golovkin in a middleweight showdown in September. That fight, like most of boxing’s biggest, was shown on pay-per-view. It cost $84.95 to be seen in high definition.

Now fans can pay significantly less – $9.99 subscription cost per month in the U.S. – to see his fights on DAZN (pronounced Da-Zone). Under the five-year partnership, Golden Boy also will put on up to 10 fight nights per year that will stream live on DAZN beginning in early 2019.

Alvarez wins narrow decision over Golovkin for middleweight title

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LAS VEGAS (AP) — Canelo Alvarez and Gennady Golovkin fought 24 rounds in the space of a year, with little to pick between them.

When the scorecards were totaled Saturday night, though, there was a new middleweight champion of the world — but not by much.

Alvarez won the 160-pound titles held by Golovkin by the narrowest of margins, taking a majority decision to hand the longtime champion his first loss as a pro.

Two judges gave Alvarez the final round, allowing him to pull out the win.

A year after the two fought to a draw, the second fight was almost as close. There were no knockdowns, but the action was spirited throughout as the two battled to the final bell before a frenzied crowd at the T-Mobile Arena.

Two judges favored Alvarez 115-113, while a third had it 114-114. The AP scored it 114-114.

“He’s a great fighter but I’m a great fighter and I showed it tonight,” Alvarez said.

The two fighters switched roles from their first fight, with Triple G trying to counter Alvarez and the Mexican fighter coming forward much of the fight. Both landed well to the head and Golovkin (38-1-1) controlled some rounds with his jab though neither were ever in any trouble of going down.

The fight was a rematch of a draw last September that left neither fighter satisfied. This time it was Golovkin who was upset, and he stormed out of the ring without talking.

“I can’t complain, that’s what we have the judges for,” said Abel Sanchez, Golovkin’s trainer.

Ringside punch stats showed a close fight, though they favored Golovkin by a small margin. Golovkin was credited with landing 234 of 879 punches while Alvarez (50-1-2) landed 203 of 622.

Almost immediately there was talk of a third fight between two middleweights who now know each other well.

“If the people want us to do it again let’s do it again,” Alvarez said. “For now I’m going to enjoy it with my family.”

Alvarez seemed to take control of the fight in the middle rounds, but Triple G came on strong in the final few rounds to make it as close as it could be. Golovkin landed several big punches to start the 12th round but still lost it on the two scorecards that ended up favoring Alvarez.

Both fighters were cut with Alvarez having one over his left eye and Golovkin cut over the right eye.

It was the first loss in 40 fights for Golovkin, the fearsome puncher from Kazakhstan who held portions of the middleweight title for seven years. And it came at the hands of the red-headed Alvarez, a Mexican star whose positive test for clenbuterol forced the rematch to be postponed from May.

They put on another show before a roaring crowd of 21,965, who crowded into the arena on the Las Vegas Strip with high anticipation in the biggest fight of the year.

Most of the crowd on Mexican Independence Day weekend favored Alvarez, who seemed to control much of the pace of the fight even while taking some sharp shots to the head. Though Golovkin has a reputation as a knockout artist, he never seemed to hurt Alvarez, who credited his fight plan with the win.

“I showed my victory with facts,” Alvarez said. “He was the one who was backing up. It was a clear victory.”

Alvarez was guaranteed $5 million to $4 million for Golovkin, though both fighters were expected to make many millions more from the biggest pay-per-view in boxing so far this year.