WWE

One-on-one with Goldberg

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Before Bill Goldberg makes his much-anticipated return to the ring to face Brock Lesnar at Survivor Series (LIVE this Sunday at 7 p.m. ET on the WWE Network), I had the chance to chat with him about the work he’s been putting at the gym, his emotional return promo, who his son plays as in WWE 2K17 (available now on PS4, Xbox One, PS3, and Xbox 360), UFC 205, Conor McGregor and the injury that he suffered on Monday night.

When you made your return a few weeks ago, you could see the emotion pour out as you walked through the curtain. What was it like to make the long walk through the back and out to the ring again?

“It’s terrifying you know … it’s … (pauses) … you’re coming back 12 years removed and trying to give people the same thing they loved before. It’s terrifying. Father time is not very receptive to keeping your body in the utmost shape once you reach a certain point in your life. Things don’t heal like they used to.”

“I just thrust myself out there man, with a very short period of time to get prepared. I’m never going to be happy. I’m never going to be satisfied. I just wish I would have had a little more time [to train], but it is what it is and you make do with what you’ve got.”

It still looks like you’re in very good shape though. Is there anything you’ve done to specifically train for this match on Sunday?

“Man I’ve trained three times a day, three days a week and then two times a day the remaining four days a week. I haven’t had a day off. I mean I’m doing PR now. I got here [NYC] at 1:30 in the morning after the show last night [in Buffalo]. I went to bed at three. I got up at 6:30 this morning to do this PR tour and then I’m flying five hours home this afternoon and I’m going to work out tonight.”

“The problem is that you’re trying to accomplish 50 things at once and it’s just not physically possible to give yourself the proper time to recuperate after all of these workouts. You know, I felt the ill effects of that when I tripped in the ring during my second appearance. I realized that I hadn’t had a day off in six weeks and I trained legs two days before that. It’s a logical explanation you know, but it’s a conundrum that’s quite difficult. You want to use your time wisely, but there’s only so much that you can shove in at one time and it becomes counterproductive. You become hurt and you’re exhausted. I’ve felt that over the past couple weeks.”

“You know five days removed from going up against one of the baddest dudes on the planet, I don’t want to be feeling like that. I’m terrified. I want to satisfy the people. I want to make my family proud of me, but at the end of the day, I’m never going to be able to satisfy myself. I just want to do it to where I can look myself in the mirror and be appreciative of the work that I put in and the performance that I did.”

Do you think that the moment you slipped in the ring it was your body telling you that it’s time to take a break?

“Oh God yes. Absolutely…”

It was at this point that I heard Goldberg say to someone from WWE: “Do we have a couple minutes extra or no?”

Guy from WWE: “Yeah we do”

Goldberg: “I’m going to jump out and buy my son something from there.”

Guy from WWE: “Sure, yeah.”

Goldberg: “I’m sorry dude, you’re going to have to keep this interview going as I buy my son some Legos.”

Well, if you say so.

You showed so much emotion in your first promo back that doesn’t seem to exist in the product anymore. How were you able to channel it and express it with the microphone?

“Man, I was just trying to be myself. I truly was. At the end of the day, that’s something that I haven’t been able to do in the wrestling ring. I put myself under so much pressure to be that monster all of the time. In my situation right now, it’s not a detriment to have a heart.”

“That’s one of my strong suits, but at the same time, I will rip your face off if you do something that I don’t like. The reigns between the two are very admirable, I believe. I think it shows that I’m diversified. I’m not just one guy. I’ve added a little dimension that I didn’t have in the past. I don’t know how to explain it, I really don’t.  I’m still horrible at them [promos]. I’m just trying to do what I do.”

Do you think the added dimension comes from the added life experiences that you’ve had?

“I think so. I think all of the things I’ve done over the past [few] years translate positively into my mic skills. Whether it’s life experiences or work experiences.”

So what was it like for your son to see you in the ring?

“It was the coolest thing in the world man! It was as cool as it can be. I’m greatly appreciative that I have the ability to be that guy. It’s really cool.”

Has he played you vs. Brock on WWE 2K17?

“Yes he has and unfortunately, he likes to play as Brock.”

Does he!?

“(Laughs) Yeah.”

Why does he play as Brock, what does he like about him?

“I don’t know, you’re going to have to ask him.”

The first time you faced Brock back at Wrestlemania 20, the crowd hijacked the match. Do you feel like this is an opportunity at redemption to deliver the match in proper context?

“In a way yes, but the unfortunate thing is people look at that match differently because of the situation that we were in. They don’t appreciate the fact that we really did put on a decent match I believe. I truly do. I don’t think I need redemption man. I really don’t. At the end of the day we give 100 percent in each performance and sometimes we can’t control the situation surrounding what’s going on and we have to do our best and that’s what we did.”

Have any of the younger guys come up to you for advice?

“Ah, not yet. I haven’t been there long enough to make them feel comfortable with me yet. I’m there for them man. I’ll give them as much advice as they ask for.”

Did you get a chance to watch UFC 205 over the weekend?

“Oh yeah, absolutely.”

What do you think of Conor McGregor’s rise?

“I think it’s indicative of the culture we have now. If you want something…..”

It was at this point my phone connection cut out with Goldberg for what felt like an eternity.

In reality, it was just 10 seconds.

“…for title shots when other guys have for their lives, but then again you have to look at the star power. You have to look at the big picture. You have to look at the money that this guy draws. I don’t like the kid. I don’t like the kid’s attitude, but I greatly appreciate his ability to be that guy. He’s working everybody and he’s doing a heck of a job. At the end of the day, the kid can back it up.”

“So, as much as I don’t appreciate some of the brash things he does, I greatly appreciate the fact that he’s one hell of a fighter and he’s even a better promoter.”

Was there anyone else on the card that stuck out to you?

“I would say that the dude who beat Weidman … (pauses) … what’s his name?”

“Yoel Romero”

“He’s an absolute freak of nature. Now I’m not real appreciative of the walk he did around the ring afterwards and what that likened itself to, but as far as raw talent and the viciousness of that kid, man he’s unbelievable.”

“I love Weidman and what he fights for. He’s a great kid. There’s a lot of great guys and girls who work in that company.”

I interviewed Weidman last year and he was one of the nicest guys I’ve met.

“He’s top notch man. They don’t make ‘em any better than him. He does it the way it should be. He does it the way I do it. At the end of the day, there’s nothing more important than your family. You live and you die to provide them with experiences and the ability to live life to its fullest and he’s a guy who takes it by the horns and I love him for it.”

“Renzo Gracie is an extremely close friend of mine and the things Renzo has told me about Chris are unbelievable.”

You told Brock “you’re last,” is this really the last time we’re going to see you in a WWE ring?

“I’m sure acting like it. At the end of the day, it’s all that I’m concerned about. I take one day as it is.”

“My body feels horrible. I tweaked my shoulder last night [on Raw], but that doesn’t mean in five days that I’m not going to come out kicking ass and taking names like I always do.”

Follow me on Twitter @ScottDargis

It’s His Time: Jeff Jarrett will be inducted into WWE’s Hall of Fame Class of 2018

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The phrase never say never is one that is used quite often in the world of professional wrestling. It’s a saying that is mostly used to drum up interest in a person’s potential return to a company or an unlikely dream match that sends the Internet into a tizzy.

But in this instance, the phrase couldn’t be more appropriate because Jeff Jarrett is the newest member of WWE’s Hall of Fame.

That’s right, J-E-double-F J-A-double-R-E-double-T is going into the H-O-F.

“I would have never dreamed that in 2018 I’d be going into the Hall of Fame,” Jarrett said to NBC Sports last week, “but as I’ve sat back and looked I said, ‘Welp, I guess there are some things that are just meant to be.’”

Considering how Jarrett’s tenure with the WWE ended in 2001, there are quite a few people who never thought the door would be open for Double-J to return.

When WWE purchased WCW back in 2001, Vince McMahon infamously fired Jarrett live on television. This wasn’t just a standard segment in which Vince “fired” someone, this was a legit termination:

For someone who grew up and then went on to succeed in the wrestling business, Jarrett understood Vince’s line of thinking, “Vince does a lot of things well,” Jarrett said. “And he knows how to produce great TV. To me that night was just good TV.”

Even though the wrestling landscape in the United States seemed dry after WWE purchased WCW and ECW folded, Jarrett wasn’t worried about his future after being fired live on television.

“It’s a business and I knew that I was going to be getting paid on my Turner contract for about another eight or nine months, so I didn’t even think to address it that night,” Jarrett said.

Just over a year later after his firing, Jarrett and his father, Jerry, launched a new pro wrestling promotion: Total Nonstop Action Wrestling. A promotion that would launch the careers of future WWE/NXT superstars including: AJ Styles, Samoa Joe, Eric Young, and Bobby Roode.

But what if Jarrett wasn’t fired in 2001? What if he stayed in what was arguably the biggest transition period in the history of WWE?

“I’ve never been a guy to look in the rearview mirror and talk about what ifs, I’ve always been a guy who looks forward,” Jarrett said.

“I think from an in-ring perspective, I was just hitting my prime years in the early 2000s. I would have loved to work with the guys in WWE during that time period, but it wasn’t meant to be. I took my career in another direction and I’m glad I did so, but the Hall of Fame is another opportunity for things to come full circle.”

And boy, are things going to come full circle.

As of now, AJ Styles is set to defend his WWE championship against Shinsuke Nakamura at WrestleMania. Styles was one of the first pieces of fresh talent that Jarrett gave a major opportunity to in the early days of TNA. Without Jarrett’s vision, who knows if the “Phenomenal One” would have blossomed into the standout performer he is today.

For Jarrett, the idea of going into the Hall of Fame on the same weekend that Styles defends the WWE title at the company’s biggest show of the year is poetic justice.

“I don’t believe in coincidences, only convergences and AJ headlining and me going in to the Hall of Fame is perfect,” Jarrett said. “He’s been a friend since the early days of our relationship and it’s been great to watch him progress as a performer. I can’t say enough about the guy.”

Not only will this be a special moment for all of the superstars on the WWE roster who were given an opportunity to learn and grow on television thanks to Jarrett, it will truly be a special moment for his family.

Professional wrestling has been a three generation business for the Jarrett family. Decades before Jeff and his father launched TNA, Jerry Jarrett founded the Continental Wrestling Association in 1977, which eventually merged with World Class Championship Wrestling to become the United States Wrestling Association.

Jeff’s grandmother got into the business in the 1940s and quickly worked her way up. Working in her promotion at the concession stand helped Jarrett realize just how viable the wrestling business could be as a form of income.

When Jarrett is inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame, he’s going to make sure that it’s a memorable time for everyone in his family who has helped him achieve this career milestone.

“It’s a humbling honor and I will be accepting it on behalf of just not myself, but my wife Karen, who has had to go through ups and downs. My dad, my stepmom, my uncle, who just passed away. My grandfather, my grandmother on the other side of my family,” Jarrett said.

“It’s a three generation business, so I’m accepting it for everyone in my family because it is a family business. That is something that is so humbling to me. I’m the one who got picked, but it’s really an award for the entire Jarrett family.”

Jarrett stayed mum about his future plans, who reached out to him from WWE about going into the HOF, and wouldn’t reveal who will induct him into the Hall of Fame, even though he already has an idea of who it will be. However, he didn’t stay quiet when asked why this is the right time for him to join the collection of wrestling’s biggest names.

“Quite frankly I’ve thought about that. Who am I? Why am I going in now? They asked and I had to do a head-scratcher because it was literally a shock,” he said. “There are less than 200 wrestlers in the Hall of Fame and you think about the thousands of guys that have laced up the boots and I’m going to be one of those 200. It just doesn’t seem right in my brain.”

While it may not seem right in Double-J’s brain, the convergence of important dates in Jarrett’s life will come to a head when he walks up to the microphone for his speech in New Orleans.

“When I first heard about it I looked at my calendar and saw that the date of the ceremony is April 6, 2018 and April 6 of 1986 was the day that I had my very first match. So 32 years to the day is sort of surreal.”

Twitter: @ScottDargis

 

 

Shawn Michaels Q&A: Legendary Raw match with John Cena, the nWo, working with WWE’s future stars

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WWE will celebrate the 25th anniversary of Raw with a unique show on Monday night at 8 p.m. ET on USA. The show will emanate from both the Manhattan Center and the Barclays Center.

I had the chance to chat with Shawn Michaels about some of the memorable matches and moments he had on Raw throughout his career, his role in developing the next wave of WWE talent and one moment when he knew he was going to venture off script during a promo. 

I’m sitting here watching the match you had with Max Moon on the first episode of Raw and I’m wondering how it must feel to know that you’re going to walk back into the Manhattan Center and participate on the 25th anniversary edition of the show.  

“Well I gotta tell you, I hope that’s where I get to go. No one has made any decisions yet as far as I know. As much as I love the Barclays Center, I would rather get to go back to the Manhattan Center.

I don’t know that at the time I was mature enough to appreciate how unbelievably cool and awesome that building was.

It’s sort of like a rock band. They start out in those places and then you want to get to play in stadiums. As phenomenal as it is to be in front of 80 or 90,000 people in a stadium, it’s really hard to beat going back to those intimate places, filling them up, and feeling that electricity, that passion, that excitement in that environment.

For me if I were to get to pick, that’s where I would want to go back to, especially on that night.”

I imagine you had a similar feeling when you appeared in San Antonio as a special guest referee in an NXT show

“Yeah! The old Aztec is a great environment as well. It’s one of the things that NXT does that I really enjoy. They play a lot of similar venues to that. It was a great deal of fun. That is one of the many things about helping out with NXT and the folks down at the [Performance Center].”

So last night as I was prepping for this interview I went on a YouTube deep dive into some of your memorable matches and moments on Raw. The first one I want to ask about is your hour-long match with John Cena in London. I’m curious to know how that came together because it’s so rare to have a WWE match that pushes the hour long mark, especially one that’s on free television.

“So that turned out at the very end of our European tour that year. We had already been on the road there for over a week.

I found out what we were doing when I got to the building and was like, ‘Oh my goodness!’

When you hear that the match is going an hour, it seems like a long time, but when you’re working with someone like John so much … I’ve had the opportunity to go back and watch that match and it just flows right by. That’s obviously a testament to John and heck I’ll even pat myself on the back a little for that one (laughs).

It’s amazing how trying to do that hour-long match didn’t seem like such a big mountain to climb. It really helps when you have a history with someone. John and I were coming off of the WrestleMania [23] match and because of that, we had a decent amount of story points to work around, so it was easy.

It obviously doesn’t hurt when you’re in a phenomenal environment as well. Let’s face it, the folks in the U.K. are pretty easy to wrestle in front of. They are a very passionate group.

I gotta say that’s one of my favorite matches.”

Another one of my favorites was the match you had with Shelton Benjamin in the Gold Rush tournament. You guys made unexpected magic in the ring that night. Had you worked with him before that match, or was it something that just organically came together as you were talking it out in the ring?

“I don’t think Shelton and I worked together before that and we barely worked together after that. It was just something that came together. Shelton is a phenomenal athlete. There isn’t anything that he can’t do and he also makes everything look flawless.

One of the strengths that I bring to the table is that I can work to other people’s strengths. If you have a lot of them, that makes it easier for me (laughs).

It’s one of those situations where you have someone who can do anything under the sun and you’re not too shabby yourself and then it becomes just a matter of putting things together that makes sense.

It certainly helps when you’re building to a certain point in the match and the timing comes off perfectly and that’s exactly how that match ended.

I know there are a fair amount of times that I’ve tried to capture that lightning in a bottle again and I don’t think it’s ever turned out as well as that did.”

Agreed. The only spot like that I can think of that came close was the superkick on Rey Mysterio, but it just didn’t have the punctuation because that was during a Survivor Series match, so it was just an elimination, which is much different than the finish of a high-energy match.

“Yes and that’s the thing. You know it is just special and when somebody asks to do it again you go, ‘Uhhhhhh we can try it ….’ I certainly knew that when it happened that it’s something you don’t mess with. You shouldn’t try to go back and do it again.”

I stumbled across the promo you cut at the beginning of Raw in Montreal in the summer of 2005. You were working with [Hulk] Hogan at that point, but obviously the only thing the crowd cared about was Bret Hart. It had to be an unbelievable feeling to know that you had everyone in the building eating out of the palm of your hand.

“That was one of the few times after I came back in 2002, where I went out there and there was absolutely no way that I was one, going to hit any of my time cues and two, that I was going to stay anywhere remotely close to the script.

That was a situation where everyone who knows anything about this line of work felt the same way as the crowd, so no one was going to be angry about it because the moment was perfect.”

Another little random moment in time is when you returned in 2002 as a member of the nWo. The group’s run was cut short due to Kevin Nash’s injury, but do you know how the storyline was supposed to play out? It seemed like we were going to get to a point where the group consisted of you, Nash, Hunter and X-Pac.

“That is a phenomenal question and I honestly don’t know where it was supposed to go because I had just gotten back to WWE. The extent of it, that I knew, was that Kevin was supposed to work with Hunter at the next Pay-Per-View.

(Writer’s note: Triple H appeared on the next PPV, Vengeance, in a segment backstage where, in storyline, SmackDown commissioner Stephanie McMahon and Raw commissioner Eric Bischoff tried to convince Triple H to sign with their brand, but Shawn Michaels persuaded Triple H to sign with Raw and then Hunter turned on him the next night when they appeared as D-Generation X.)

I know that we had turned on Booker and then we turned on [Big] Show, but I honestly don’t know where it was going because I was just finding my footing and didn’t know enough to be asking someone, ‘Where is this going?’

I had no intention of wrestling at that point and then of course so many things changed after Kevin went down. I need to hunt someone down and find the answer.”

In an interview you talked about fading into the background, but now here you are working at the Performance Center and helping out with NXT. What was it about being down there that made you want to get involved?

“It’s honestly the environment at the PC. Matt Bloom, Sara Amato, Terry Taylor, Robbie [Brookside], Norman [Smiley], Steve [Corino]. There are just so many great people who are there to do one thing.

Everyone is pulling the rope in the same direction. Absolutely nobody is trying to prove anything to anyone. Nobody is looking to do anything but help these young men and women have an opportunity to go out there and do what we had a chance to do.

It doesn’t work if all of those men and women you work with are all pains in the backside, but they’re not. If there was something that stuck in my craw I’d tell ya, but that’s what drew me to it.

For me, it was a situation where I looked at it and said, ‘Oh my goodness, all of the stuff that I absolutely love about this business is here and all of the stuff that I don’t care for and that I don’t feel like doing again are also here.’ It was just an absolutely perfect situation. It’s infectious and you feed off of the desire and the passion.

And then of course the direction and the vision of the people who are running that place. I’m not even talking about Hunter. He’s my buddy, obviously, and I can hang around him no matter what, but it’s what Matt and Sara and everyone else brings to that place.

It’s just a fun thing to be a part of and it’s fun be a part of the wrestling business.”

I have to imagine it’s great for someone like you who has so much experience in the business to help people when they’re struggling to find the answer with something and you can call back on an experience that will help them understand how to solve the issue.

“For sure and also getting them to think in ways that they might not know, or even more importantly, letting them know that what they were thinking about was right.

It also helps them because I was a risk-taker during my career. I’m certainly less structured than almost everybody else there (laughs). There’s a little bit of a rebellious gunslinger in me and that’s something that might be a part of some of them and I think those are the people who can be put with me and we can see where it goes.

I think they understand that if I say it’s too much, then it’s probably too much because let’s face it, there isn’t much that I think is too much.”

So what talent has stood out to you down there?

I love my guys. That’s [Johnny] Gargano, Roddy (Roderick Strong), Velveteen Dream, Adam Cole, Drew McIntyre, Killian Dain, Alexander Wolfe, [Tommaso] Ciampa, Authors of Pain, they’re doing great.

But as I’m learning now, there’s so much talent worldwide that I think the wrestling business is in great shape for the future.

What makes NXT standout to me in this clustered landscape of professional wrestling is the way it blends old school storyline building blocks, but with a new school twist in terms of in-ring style.

“I 100 percent agree with ya. It’s all of the sort of stuff that you like about the old school wrestling, but it’s done in today’s style. I think it’s a perfect dose of both.

Again one of the things that really helps down at the PC is, I’m not the bitter old timer (laughs). I encourage the change, I encourage the evolution, but it’s important for them to hear when they need to slow down. I tell them, you won’t slow down as much as they probably want you to, but neither did I. It’s all a learning curve.

I think it’s important for them to know that people said the same things to me when I was that age.”

Twitter: @ScottDargis