BALTIMORE - MAY 16:  Calvin Borel, riding Rachel Alexandra, crosses the finish line ahead of Mine That Bird to win the 134th Preakness Stakes at Pimlico Race Course on May 16, 2009 in Baltimore, Maryland.  (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)
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Dolphus Morrison, breeder of Rachel Alexandra, dies at 82

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COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) Dolphus Morrison, a longtime horseman and the breeder of the great filly Rachel Alexandra, has died. He was 82.

He died Wednesday at a nursing home and had Alzheimer’s, his wife, Ellen, said.

Morrison was involved in thoroughbred racing for more than three decades when he and trainer Hal Wiggins struck gold with Rachel Alexandra in 2009. The champion filly, named after a granddaughter of Morrison’s, won the Preakness that year and became the face of his breeding program.

“He was kind, he was smart, he was generous,” breeder and longtime friend Dede McGehee of Heaven Trees Farm told The Blood-Horse, a thoroughbred racing trade publication. “He was a little unorthodox at times, but he was a father figure to me. He was kind to everyone who worked on the farm, he was kind to everyone who worked on the track. He treated everybody with respect.”

After Wiggins decided to switch jockeys to Calvin Borel, Rachel Alexandra took off on a nine-race winning streak. Rachel Alexandra soared to victory in the Kentucky Oaks by a record 20 1/4 lengths and became the first filly in 85 years to win the Preakness, the second leg of the Triple Crown.

Other victories in 2009 included the Haskell and Woodward, and she was honored as Horse of the Year. This past August she was inducted into the National Museum of Racing’s Hall of Fame.

Morrison nearly sold Rachel Alexandra when she didn’t display early signs of the champion she would become. She finished sixth in her 2-year-old debut in May 2008 at Churchill Downs and won only two of her first five starts. He and partner Mike Lauffer finally sold her to Stonestreet Stables before the Preakness.

Morrison ended his breeding operation in 2012.

In addition to his wife, he is survived by three children and two grandchildren. Funeral arrangements are pending.

Prize Exhibit wins $100,000 Megahertz Stakes at Santa Anita

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ARCADIA, Calif. (AP) Prize Exhibit rallied from fifth with three furlongs remaining and won the $100,000 Megahertz Stakes for older fillies and mares by 1 1/4 lengths Monday at Santa Anita.

Ridden by Mike Smith, Prize Exhibit ran a mile on turf in 1:35.56 and paid $8.80, $4.40 and $3.40.

Ireland-bred Jeremy’s Legacy returned $9 and $4.60. The Mystic was another head back in third and paid $3.40 to show as the 3-1 second choice.

The Grade 3 victory, worth $60,000, increased Prize Exhibit’s career earnings to $637,045, with seven wins in 31 starts. She had been winless in 10 starts since capturing the Grade 2 Monrovia Stakes at the track a year ago.

“She can be tricky,” trainer Jim Cassidy said. “We’ve had to do a lot of different things with her and she’s just been happier lately.”

Green Gratto by a head in Aqueduct’s Toboggan Stakes

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NEW YORK — Green Gratto held on to win the $125,000 Toboggan Stakes by a head on Monday at Aqueduct.

The 7-year-old set the pace under persistent pressure from Story to Tell. Green Gratto finally put away that rival in deep stretch, and had enough in reserve to fend off a final challenge from All Star Red.

The victory capped a big weekend at Aqueduct for jockey Kendrick Carmouche, who got three stakes wins in a four-day span.

The New Jersey-bred Green Gratto, owned and trained by Gaston Grant, earned his eighth win in 51 starts. The time was 1:10.74 for the six furlongs.

Green Gratto paid $7.30, $4.50 and $2.40 as the 5-2 second choice.

All Star Red returned $11 and $3.40, and Stallwalkin’ Dude, the 4-5 favorite, paid $2.10 to show.