WWE

WWE Weekly Recap: Kevin Owens and the meaning of being a champion

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So let’s get this straight; Finn Balor becomes the first WWE Universal champion, but he’s forced to relinquish the title due to a torn labrum. A tournament is held to determine the next champion. Seth Rollins, the company’s silver boy Roman Reigns, Vince’s new favorite toy Big Cass and one of the indy darlings HHH brought to the biggest company in the land, Kevin Owens, all won matches on Raw last week in order to qualify for a Fatal-Four Way title match.

Before we dive into the fallout from Raw, let’s take a moment to appreciate the guys who are currently in the main event picture because it’s quite the unique group:

Dean Ambrose the current WWE Champion; established himself on the independent scene before signing a developmental deal in 2011.

AJ Styles was Mr. TNA for the better part of 2002-2013. Two-time IWGP champion, leader of the Bullet Club. Signed in January of this year.

Seth Rollins was better known as Tyler Black during his run on the independents, which included a stint as the ROH world champion. Rollins was the first NXT champion.

Finn Balor or Prince Devitt. He’s a three-time IWGP junior heavyweight champion, first leader of the Bullet Club and longest reigning NXT champion in history. Balor was an instrumental part in getting NXT over as more than just WWE’s developmental brand.

John Cena aka John Cena Sucks.

Brock Lesnar. Dude is just a freak.

– Randy Orton. Mr. RKO was in the same developmental class as Brock Lesnar.

– Roman Reigns, better known as pet project of Vince McMahon. Reigns had no prior experience before signing a deal with WWE in 2010.

And after the finish to Monday night’s final segment, Kevin Owens can officially join this exclusive list.

Or maybe not…

Franci

These Crossroads Are Painted Red

There are two ways to view Owens’ surprising title win. You’re either OK with HHH’s involvement, or you’re annoyed with Super Suit Hunter for killing Reigns and Rollins with pedigrees.

Let’s examine the latter first:

It’s easy to frame the conclusion to Monday’s main event as Hunter thrusting himself into the spotlight for the first time since WrestleMania season, while immediately placing Owens and the Universal title in the background. HHH’s reputation for getting himself over at the expense of others is notorious. Sure he’s calmed down since putting on the suit and transforming into the Godfather of NXT, but if you’re a long-time fan, you’ve witnessed Hunter exterminate someone’s momentum.

When Hunter snuck into the ringside area during the main event and hit a pedigree on Reigns, the crowd roared with approval because it indicated the end of Roman’s chances to walk out of Houston with the title.

Hunter then “turned” on his golden boy, which is something that had been speculated on for months (HHH’s original WrestleMania opponent was heavily rumored to be Rollins), but instead of turning Rollins babyface in the moment, the crowd roared with approval when Hunter crushed him with his finishing move. In fairness, the crowd immediately realized Owens was about to win the title and based off of the reaction KO received when his entrance music hit, it’s exactly what the crowd in Houston wanted to see.

It was easy to leave the show thinking HHH had ascended to the top babyface role on Raw. The post-match stare down between Hunter-Foley/Stephanie sure made it seem like we’re getting an angle where face Hunter challenges the authority of a tweener authority figure in Foley and heel Stephanie. It pains me to say this, but we could very well witness an angle where the McMahon’s will once again play chess with the full-time members of the roster acting as their pawns.

Yes, let out a collective sigh because you know this is a very realistic scenario.

Feeny

If you’re OK with HHH’s assistance, here’s the other way you can look at the finish to Monday night, which I promise is a lot more satisfying.

Someone with the appearance of Kevin Owens isn’t exactly Vince’s prototypical champion. He has a heavy build; he’s barely six feet tall and has the look of a stereotypical pro wrestler. The list of recent world champions look nothing like Owens (Ambrose, Rollins, Reigns, HHH, Sheamus, Lesnar, Cena, Orton, Punk, Del Rio). In fact, the last world champion to have a similar build to Owens was Mankind, whose last title reign ended before the turn of the century. So right off of the bat, we should be thrilled that someone who looks like Owens is walking around with the most important prop in the company.

According to Dave Meltzer of the Wrestling Observer, Owens was rumored to face Balor for the Universal title at Hell in the Cell in October, which would then lead to a triple threat at Survivor Series between Balor, Owens and Jericho. The odds of those matches closing the show are about as good as Amin Elhassan apologizing for his ridiculous comment about Kevin Owens’ son.

Let’s imagine a world where Balor’s right labrum is still intact. He’d probably face Rollins in a rematch at Clash of Champions. HHH could easily interfere in a similar way to what he did on Monday night and help Finn retain the title. Balor would then spin off to face Owens at HIAC, while Rollins would headline the show against HHH in a cell match. Owens would be a formidable opponent for Balor, but it’s highly unlikely that he was going to walk out of HIAC or Survivor Series with the title.

In this scenario, Owens would stay in his spot in the upper mid-card with no sign of upward trajectory. It’s a fine spot to be in, but there would be serious risk of Owens becoming stale, until he eventually had a breakthrough moment similar to Punk’s pipebomb, which is always what I thought would happen because he’s just too talented to stay out of the main event picture.

Due to Balor’s injury, Reigns’ mistake outside of the ring and the lack of main event depth on the Raw roster, Owens was given the big red ball made of leather. The company hasn’t been afraid to give Owens extended time with the microphone and he’s one of the best in-ring performers in the world, which is the recipe needed for success in 2016. He can cut a compelling 15-minute promo to open the show and close it with an exciting 20-minute match.

K.O. also recently stated that he wouldn’t be in the WWE without Hunter, which is a perfect apple for the creative team to bite on. The line between reality and fantasy is so blurred at this point that it’s impossible to see. Owens can easily cut a promo next Monday and give credit to Hunter, while thanking himself for being in the position to capitalize on Balor’s injury, which is a legitimate claim. Hell, Hunter can even come out, cut a short promo (I know it’s a pipedream) and then introduce Owens as his protégé. Maybe this angle will evolve into an NXT stable led by Hunter.

TB

I listened to Bryan Alvarez complain this week that Owens couldn’t have possibly dreamed of winning the title this way. Honestly does it matter? Owens didn’t appear to be on his way to the main event picture anytime soon and felt like he was quickly becoming the most underutilized guy on the roster. Now he’s the champion of the company’s flagship show.

Time to “Go Home”

-So according to Daniel Bryan, he and The Miz are no longer allowed to have interaction on WWE programming because their “Talking Smack” segment became a major talking point. We should all be worried that “Talking Smack” might be toned down to avoid a situation like this from happening in the future.

– If you can properly explain the point of Stephanie-Heyman’s segment, I’ll send you a box of Booty O’s.

– I never considered how awesome the New Day and Bayley would be as unit until I saw them together. Now I want to see them together every week.

– Does Apollo Crews now have a spelling gimmick?

– Outside of AJ Styles, Heath Slater has been the best booked character on WWE programming. He hit another home run on Tuesday night with the trailer segment.

– Rhyno should carry a package of crackers and a can of cheese to the ring.

– Before Rhyno Gored one of the Head Bangers he said “come on you son of a bitch,” which was probably due to the giant cut he received above his left eye when he was waffled by a stiff elbow.

– The jobber who faced Nia Jax on Monday was very audible when she told Nia “that hurt” after taking a shoulder in the corner.

– “The face that runs the place” has already gotten old.

– AJ Styles wearing Cena’s headband has not.

– Carmella’s beat down on Nikki Bella looked excellent.

– The rest of the Smackdown women’s division though…..

– I love these new ring posts. Cesaro and Sheamus came up with a creative spot that should play into their best of seven series and Styles found a way to use it in his match vs. Crews. I expect the cruiserweights to use the platform on top of the posts when they debut on Raw.

– Hey, that was a pretty good promo from Randy Orton!

– Braun Strowman screaming at the beginning of his entrance always cracks me up.

– Will this Titus vs. Darren Young feud ever end?

– When Charlotte and Dana Brooke finally split up, I hope she ends up paired with Anderson and Gallows. Really liked what I saw from those three.

– I couldn’t believe Mike Cole actually called the Liontamer by its proper name.

– Jericho vs. Owens for the title would be glorious.

– But not as glorious as the CWC has been.

Twitter: @ScottDargis

Paul ‘Triple H’ Levesque’s quest to change WWE as we know it

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Paul Levesque, aka “Triple H”, has evolved from one of the top performers of his generation, to a prominent role behind the scenes as the Executive Vice President of Talent, Live Events and Creative for WWE. I had the chance to chat with “HHH” about what he specifically looks for when he’s recruiting new talent, why this past year has been so challenging for NXT and how he presents new talent to Vince McMahon. 

(Don’t miss NXT Takeover: Orlando on Saturday, April 1 at 8 p.m. ET Live on WWE Network)

Me: You’ve had an incredible in-ring career; a 14-time world champion. As I look up and down the WrestleMania 33 card I see so many NXT alums and I wonder, what did you learn from your time as a performer that has helped you as an evaluator of talent?

Paul “HHH” Levesque: “Oh man … everything that I’ve learned since I’ve walked through the door. The funny thing for me is that I’ve been in a unique position during my career. I was fascinated early with the behind the scenes and production aspects of the business.

So, shortly after I came to WWE I was in creative conversations with Vince that led to me to being offered to come to production meetings, which I didn’t have to go to. I would get up early on TV days and go to these production meetings that I didn’t need to be a part of. People thought I was crazy, but I wasn’t trying to do anything more than learn. I wanted to learn what they were looking for.

The vision of what the talent thinks they want and what the office thinks they want are sometimes two different things.

I have the unique perspective of having both sides and that allows me to I think look at talent a different way, but to also to be able to say here’s what you need to be able to do. Here’s the way you need to be able to work at it. Here’s the way you need to perceive cameras and how cameras see you. How you put your character out there and how you put your brand out there.

At the end of the day for us, characters are all about charisma. So that’s the thing you’re looking for the most. I see a lot of unbelievable athletes come through the Performance Center; sometimes they have charisma, sometimes they don’t.

I’ve hired a lot [of people] that have charisma, but aren’t necessarily the greatest athletes we saw that week because you just can’t take your eyes off of them.

For example, there’s a guy that I hired in China that everybody on the team who was over there didn’t put this kid on the list and when we went through the list at the end of the day of who we’re going to offer an opportunity to come and train with the WWE I was like, ‘Where’s this kid?’ and everyone was like, ‘You’re kidding, right?’

I was like, ‘No, where is he?’ He was heavy and a Mongolian wrestler, so he’s athletic but he’s heavier and in some ways he’s not anything we would look for, but he worked his butt off. He was always last, but he never quit man. He just went. Some guys would pull up with an injury and they’d go sit out. You could clearly tell that they were just gasping for air and needed to sit for a second. They’d be back ten minutes later.

He gutted through everything and you couldn’t take your eyes off of this guy. He did stuff that was funny, even though he didn’t mean for it to be that way. He was always the center of attention, even when he wasn’t doing anything!

Everyone was against him and I said ‘Is there anybody in this room who didn’t watch this guy the entire day? I’ve heard everyone talk about this guy. Why? He’s the sleeper money in this group.’

So we brought him [to the Performance Center] and there’s not a week goes by that somebody doesn’t send me a clip or a photo of him doing something where there’s 10 or 15 people around him watching. He’s just one of those naturally charismatic people that you can’t put your finger on why.

I look for that more than I look for anything else.

Is he ever going to do a moonsault? Probably not. Is he ever going to be a Shawn Michaels in the ring? I guarantee you he won’t. But, if he loves it, if he works hard and keeps himself straight, he’s probably going to make it and he’s probably going to be good.

That’s the biggest thing to me, the charisma factor.”

You kind of answered my next question, but I’ll ask it anyway. When you’re scouting someone, what do you specifically look for?

“Look, I mean there are other factors as well. I don’t want to make it sound like ‘Oh, look at this guy he has a big personality and forget all of the rest of it.’ Obviously athleticism, the willingness to do this, the desire to work hard, but then there’s leadership qualities that we really look for.

When guys go to a camp, sometimes people watch them and go, ‘You’re just making these people throw-up in garbage can because you’re working them so hard.’ I want to push them to where they’re really outside of their comfort range and then see what they do with it.

It’s really easy to be nice and be the perfect professional when you feel great, but when you’re on the verge of puking in barrel and you’re exhausted and there’s someone barking at you to do more and the guy next to you just fell on you because he’s at the same place you are, do you help pick him up or do you curse at him and go about your own business?

There are differences in how people react to things. I’m looking for leaders. I’m looking for someone that can be a professional. I’m looking for the consummate athlete on all aspects.

It’s not just one thing, but if you ask me the one thing I look for, charisma is king.”

Going back for a second to the guy that you were talking about in China; it seemed as though there was and still is a certain look that a talent needs in order to reach a certain level of success in WWE. Now, obviously there have been exceptions to the rule, but it seems like over the past few years you’ve bucked that trend. How did that transition happen?

“So, I’m a big believer in talent is talent. It comes in all shapes, sizes, looks, feels, everything. I think sometimes there’s been a bad rap of like take this as the thing that’s most successful, so that’s what we’re going to give.

I think that’s happen here in the past. People can say whatever about WWE and look, is there a particular style of athlete [we look for]? Sure, it’s like that in anything.

If you’re shown steak all of the time, it’s no surprise that you’re going to eat steak. So when everybody coming to you with the same look and feel, a certain pattern begins to develop because that’s what being put in front of you and that’s what you have to select from.

My selection process is different. Yes, I understand what Vince likes and what Vince sees in an ideal archetype performer, but I also know him well enough to know that he likes a lot of different archetypes, so I’m not going to give him one; I’m going to give him a little bit of everything.

He’s going to see a Bray Wyatt and go (Vince voice) ‘That’s great!’ He’s going to see a Braun Strowman and go ‘Ah yeah, that’s my wheelhouse right there. I love that.’ He’s going to see Finn Balor and hear the girls going nuts and then see the paint and go ‘Geez look at that, I love that!’ That’s something that I don’t think would have been put in front of him eight years ago.

I sometimes wonder if Bray Wyatt would have been put in front of him 10 years ago. I don’t know that he would of. That doesn’t mean that Vince wouldn’t have loved him back then.

I want there to be so much diversity on every level. I want it to be international diversity. I want there to be something for everybody within WWE so you can gravitate towards characters that you can relate to. That’s still a work in progress.

It’s a work in progress when you look at the Performance Center and you look at the talent there and see that 40 percent of the talent is international now, there’s 17 countries represented. A quarter of the talent there is women. The diversity level is at an all-time high and that’s on purpose. We’ve done that for desired effect.

Is it showing right now on the main roster? Nah, not necessarily because it’s going to take a little bit of time to percolate up, but it’s there.

I want that diversity. When you talk about the women, I want there to be a Sasha Banks; the smaller, run her mouth, cocky, arrogant, little athlete. I want there to be a bigger, dominant athlete like a Charlotte. I want there to be a Nia Jax that brings a whole different danger component. I want there to be a Bayley that is this naïve, fan-friendly, little girl centric character that everybody loves.

Then you still want there to be the Bellas, who are like the Kardashians of the women’s division. You want that variety.

It’s the same with the guys. I want there to be a Cena, I want there to be a Randy Orton. But I also want there to be a Bray Wyatt. I want there to be a Braun Strowman. I want there to be a Finn Balor. I want there to be a Samoa Joe or a Kevin Owens. Big Cass and then a little guy like Enzo that can run his mouth nonstop.

I want that diversity.”

As I looked at the WrestleMania card and noticed all of the former NXT stars, I thought about how much the roster has changed over the last year. There have been so many guys and girls that have gotten the call-up to the main roster, how challenging has it been to deal with such a major transition to NXT?

“So that’s been the most challenging thing for me in the last year. When we had the draft, 16 talents got called up. I started over with the women’s division. Thank God I kept Asuka because she’s been the anchor. My male division was pretty much stripped down. I lost a lot of it.

Behind the scenes, the same thing happened. My executive producer that works with me on the show got called up. I got a new one; he made it two weeks before he got called up.

I lost my edit team that helped me get the feel and the look of the brand because they got called up. I was thrilled for them. They were so good that the office said, ‘Look we’re expanding, we’re going to do 205, we’re going to do this, we’re going to do that. We need these people.’

I’m very hands on with the writing of NXT and the team that was writing NXT with me got called up. When we split the brands, we needed a different writing team and they got called up.

So I started over with this whole new team and they needed to get their feet on the ground. It was really a brand new start over point for us. That’s challenging, but that’s also to me part of the strength of NXT. It’ll change, but it’ll be fresh and it’ll be different than it was a year ago. I’m not saying it’s always going to be better, but it’ll be different.

I just got a whole new behind the scenes team and it’s taken me since SummerSlam to get them, but I just got them and I’m really excited about it. I feel like for the first time since the draft, NXT is back in business and we’re going to rock and roll.

I’m looking forward to NXT constantly keeping us on our toes and the demand for more and more on the main roster, the demand for more and more shows, whether that is localized content in the UK, or the cruiserweight division or the women’s tournament that we’ll have coming up sometime this year.

All of those things are exciting opportunities and make NXT an exciting opportunity.”

Can you describe what it feels like to see a talent that has had success in NXT, but struggles to find their footing on the main roster?

“It’s hard for me. It’s hard for them. It’s a difficult situation. I say this to talent all of the time, careers are marathons, they are not sprints.

Even though we say it’s a third brand, it really is and you might never make it out of NXT and you’ll do really well in your career, but if you do get the chance to go to Raw or SmackDown, it’s like starting over. You’re starting over with new management and new everything. The job is the same, but you’re starting over and you have to re-earn your stripes. It’s a slightly different product.

It used to be that way in the territory days. You might be over in one territory and take the gamble to go to another territory and sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t.

It can be frustrating for them. They ask a lot of questions and we try to give them as much guidance as we can.

The other thing though that everybody has to remember is that in today’s world if you’re not “The Guy or The Girl” at the very top, the number one draw, you can still be a talent on Raw or SmackDown and working all of the time and be doing very, very well for yourself.

Do you always want more? Yes. Will that come over time? Maybe.

You reinvent yourself, you work hard. You continue to do the things you’re doing.

Back to the career being a marathon and not a sprint; when you’re a few years in, being on Raw or SmackDown and you’ve only been in the business for four years or whatever, it’s not a bad place to be.

If two years down the line you get that ride up to a much higher level, it’s a pretty good run.”

Twitter: @ScottDargis

WWE’s Bayley: Facing Stephanie McMahon would be a ‘dream’ match

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Even though Bayley made her main roster debut back in late-August, she’s quickly become one of the biggest fan-favorites on the main roster. Before she defends her Raw Women’s Championship at WrestleMania, Sunday, April 2 at 7pm ET live on WWE Network, I had the chance to chat with Ms. Hug Life about her extra time in NXT, if she asked for any advice from The Rock and her dream opponent. 

Me: While three of the “Four Horsewomen” were called up to the main roster, you stayed down in NXT. Do you think you needed the extra time in developmental?

Bayley: “Yeah, now looking back I definitely did. At the time obviously I was like what about me? I’m ready, let’s go! I wanted to do everything that they did. Now looking back, I think that has been the most important year of my career. I look back and think I wasn’t ready. I was so dependent on them throughout my years in NXT. If something went wrong, I always had them, but the year without them was all on me.

The whole division relied on me, everybody came to me for advice. If something went wrong, it was my fault. I really needed that leadership to build confidence in myself. In the future if I’m the leader for the locker room in WWE, I know that I can handle it. I was able to work with girls that have never been in a wrestling ring with before, girls who were just getting started, and girls who have been doing it forever like Asuka.

It was the most important year and maybe one of the most fun years I’ve had.”

You’ve been on the road with the main roster for seven months now; do you find yourself still adjusting to what life is like on the main roster?

“A little bit … the actual backstage and being in WWE was easy because in NXT the coaches and Triple H had prepared us for what to expect. That’s what the Performance Center is for, from doing promo class, to being in the ring for hours, to watching your matches back.

It’s the traveling and not being able to see my dog every day when I get home (laughs) that’s a little bit harder to deal with. I don’t think I’ll ever get used to that, but it’s all worth it though.

The brands are split right now; I can’t imagine what it would have been like to do two TV [tapings] every week.”

What’s the first word that comes to mind when you think about winning the Raw Women’s Championship?

“Oh man … just unbelievable. I just didn’t expect all of that to happen so fast.”

Obviously you’re a lifelong fan and I’m sure you envisioned that moment happening, so what went through your mind as you stood there with the title, in the ring, in front of thousands of people?

“I wish my family was there. That was the first thing that I thought about. My mom always says, you have a title match, should I be there? She was at every single NXT title match because she never knew if that was going to be the night. I just knew that she was going to be so mad that she wasn’t there.I knew they were watching.

I was in the Cow Palace when Eddie Guerrero won his first [world] title. I felt like I knew him and was so happy for him. I remember him jumping into the crowd and the crowd being so happy and then I did that and I just had that vision in my mind. It was weird! The crowd just made it more special considering my family wasn’t there. It was just amazing.

Did The Rock give you any advice when you met him?

“He told me that he watches and said you’re the champion so you must be doing something right. I was like, yeah I guess so. I didn’t want to take up too much of his time. He said that he really enjoys watching. I hope he wasn’t just saying that to be nice though.”

Recently you’ve been paired on television with Stephanie McMahon quite a bit and she plays a character that rarely gets one-upped by a babyface. Have you thought about Bayley-Steph in the same way that “Stone Cold” Steve Austin had Vince McMahon?

“I’ve thought about that so many times. Even when I was a kid (laughs). When she was having matches with Lita, I was like I want to have matches with Stephanie one day. That’s one of my dream matches to be honest.

If it could continue on, like you said with Austin and Vince, that would be so much fun, but I’m sure it’s a little much to ask for right now.”

Do you find yourself putting extra pressure on your shoulders because you’re the champ going into WrestleMania?

“Yeah totally. I’m probably doing way too much. Leading up to it I’m just stressing myself out. Do I need to get into the gym three times a day and try to still make everyone happy by doing all of these things that I need to do? I don’t even really know how to prepare for Mania, so I’m just doing what I think I need to do and I might be doing too much.

I think once I get to Orlando and I can digest what’s actually happening and appreciate it and know like holy crap dude, you’re here, then I’ll be able to calm down a bit. Right now, I have to be over-prepared.”

Twitter: @ScottDargis