LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 09:  Serena Williams of The United States plays a backhand during The Ladies Singles Final against Angelique Kerber of Germany on day twelve of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on July 9, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Pool/Getty Images)
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U.S. Open Day 2: Live Coverage

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Welcome to live coverage of day two of the U.S. Open. Here are the results so far:

11:35 p.m.

Serena Williams has used the cupping therapy that drew so much attention during the Olympics when Michael Phelps won gold with purple circles dotting his shoulder and back.

But the 22-time major champion says it’s been for relaxation, not recovery.

After her first-round win at the U.S. Open on Tuesday, Williams said: “If I go to my lady in Palm Beach, it’s part of acupuncture. I love getting it; it makes me relax.”

She adds: “I was like, `Wow, you can do that for recovery?'”

She says she has never done it away from home before but maybe she’ll start. Williams says: “I’m always learning new things. I definitely would love to try it on the road because I love the way it feels.”

11:20 p.m.

Andy Murray got off to an easy start at the U.S. Open in his attempt to become the fourth man in the Open era to reach all four Grand Slam finals in a single season.

The 2012 champion at Flushing Meadows and seeded No. 2 this year, Murray beat Lukas Rosol 6-3, 6-2, 6-2 on Tuesday night to get to the second round.

Murray lost to No. 1 Novak Djokovic in the finals of the Australian Open in January and French Open in June, and then won his second Wimbledon title last month.

Only Djokovic (last season), Roger Federer (2004, 2006 and 2007) and Rod Laver (1969, when he completed a calendar-year Grand Slam) have been to a season’s four major title matches since the professional era began in 1968.

Murray has won 23 of his past 24 matches, including an unprecedented second consecutive Olympic singles gold medal at the Rio Games this month.

9:15 p.m.

American Steve Johnson rallied from down two sets and a break to move on to the second round at the U.S. Open.

The 19th-seeded Johnson outlasted Evgeny Donskoy 4-6, 1-6, 7-6 (2), 6-3, 6-3 in 3 hours, 13 minutes.

Donskoy, ranked 79th, served for the match in the third set, and then had two match points on Johnson’s serve three games later.

Johnson, who lost in the first round at his last three U.S. Opens, routed Donskoy 6-1, 6-1 at the Olympics less than three weeks earlier. It was his second career comeback from down two sets.

He had 54 unforced errors in the first three sets and 20 in the last two. Johnson next faces 2009 U.S. Open champ Juan Martin del Potro.

8:50 p.m.

Serena Williams’ serve was in fine form in a routine first-round win over Ekaterina Makarova at the U.S. Open.

The top-seeded Williams had played just three singles matches since Wimbledon because of a sore right shoulder, but it didn’t show as she hit 12 aces, with only one double-fault, in a 6-3, 6-3 victory Tuesday in 63 minutes.

It was a potentially tricky draw for Williams as she opened her bid for a record 23rd major title. Makarova is a two-time Grand Slam semifinalist who just missed a seed.

Williams’ first serve averaged 108 mph, and she hit one as hard as 121 mph.

7:55 p.m.

In the latest outburst by Bernard Tomic, the Australian muttered at a heckler during his U.S. Open match that he was going to perform a lewd act on that person.

Tomic said after his first-round loss Tuesday that he apologized to the fan afterward. He added, though: “He definitely baited me the whole set for me to say that. But I do apologize if there were people around that heard. That’s all I can say.”

The 17th-seeded Tomic lost 6-4, 6-3, 4-6, 7-6 (0) to 72nd-ranked Damir Dzumhur, making 78 unforced errors.

The vulgar comments came during the first set as Dzumhur was trying to serve. Tomic later claimed he didn’t remember what the heckler was saying to him.

Tomic, 23, has attracted plenty of controversy on and off the court. He has been accused of tanking matches and suspended from Australia’s Davis Cup team and had multiple run-ins with police. His father, who serves as his coach, was given an eight-month suspended sentence and banned from the ATP Tour for a year in September 2013 for assaulting his son’s former hitting partner.

7:10 p.m.

Juan Martin del Potro, the 2009 champ, has won his opening match in his first U.S. Open since 2013.

Del Potro beat fellow Argentine Diego Schwartzman 6-4, 6-4, 7-6 (3) on Tuesday after missing the tournament the last two years because of three left wrist surgeries.

Del Potro is ranked just 142nd and needed a wild card to get in. But he proved with his unexpected silver medal at the Olympics that he can contend again.

In his first match since losing to Andy Murray in four grueling sets in the final in Rio, del Potro showed few ill effects of his emotionally and physically draining run there.

Schwartzman is ranked 73 spots better than del Potro right now, but he’s never been in the top 50 or advanced past the second round at a major.

6:50 p.m.

Venus Williams needed three sets to win her 18th first-round match at the U.S. Open.

She defeated Kateryna Kozlova of Ukraine 6-2, 5-7, 6-4 despite 63 unforced errors.

Williams led 5-2 in the third set, but the 22-year-old Kozlova pushed her to the limit in the 2-hour, 42-minute match.

Williams, a two-time winner in Flushing Meadows, next faces Julia Georges, who defeated Yanina Wickmayer 6-3, 6-2.

4:50 p.m.

Third-seeded Stan Wawrinka advanced to the second round of the U.S. Open with a straight-set win.

The two-time major champion beat Fernando Verdasco 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-4 on Tuesday despite more unforced errors than winners (37-30). He saved all four break points he faced, while converting two of his five chances, which was just enough for the victory.

The 32-year-old Verdasco is a former top-10 player, but he hasn’t been to a major quarterfinal since 2013.

4:30 p.m.

American teen Jared Donaldson has upset 12th-seeded David Goffin for his first career win over a top-30 player.

The 19-year-old qualifier won 4-6, 7-5, 6-4, 6-0 in the first round of the U.S. Open on Tuesday for his first victory at a major. He had lost in straight sets in his two previous Grand Slam matches, both at Flushing Meadows. Donaldson is ranked a career-best 122nd.

Goffin reached his first major quarterfinal at this year’s French Open.

4:10 p.m.

American Sam Querrey couldn’t build on his upset of Novak Djokovic in his next Grand Slam.

The 29th-seeded Querrey lost to Janko Tipsarevic 7-6 (4), 6-7 (0), 6-3, 6-3 in the first round of the U.S. Open on Tuesday. It was a tough opening matchup for Querrey – Tipsarevic is a former top-10 player whose ranking is down to 250th after a series of injuries. A two-time quarterfinalist at Flushing Meadows, Tipsarevic got in on a protected ranking.

He’d lost five straight Grand Slam matches dating to the 2013 U.S. Open before Tuesday.

Querrey stunned the top-ranked Djokovic in the third round at Wimbledon en route to his first major quarterfinal. But in six of his past eight Grand Slams, he’s lost to a lower-ranked opponent in the first round.

He’s also dropped seven of his past eight meetings with Serbian opponents – the only win that upset of Djokovic at Wimbledon.

3:30 p.m.

Samantha Stosur has advanced to the second round of the U.S. Open with a 7-5, 6-7 (4), 6-1 win over Camila Giorgi.

The 2011 U.S. Open champion needed three sets against Giorgi, who had an ace to win the second-set tiebreaker. But the 67th-ranked Giorgi got off to a slow start in the third, with Stosur taking a 4-0 lead in the deciding set.

Giorgi capitalized on only 3 of 14 break-point opportunities. She won 15 of 20 net points, but finished with 45 unforced errors.

Stosur will next face Zhang Shuai, who defeated Ellen Perez 6-1, 6-1.

1:50 p.m.

Rio Olympics bronze medalist and 2014 U.S. Open runner-up Kei Nishikori has avoided what would have been his fourth first-round exit in his past six appearances at Flushing Meadows.

Nishikori, who earned Japan’s first Olympic tennis medal since 1920 a little more than two weeks ago, advanced in New York on Tuesday by beating Benjamin Becker 6-1, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3.

The sixth-seeded Nishikori reached his first Grand Slam final at the U.S. Open two years ago, losing to Marin Cilic at that stage. But he exited in the first round in 2011, 2013 and 2015.

Becker, a German who won on NCAA singles title at Baylor University, has lost his past 15 matches against opponents ranked in the top 10.

1:30 p.m.

Ana Ivanovic is out of the U.S. Open in the first round for the second straight year after a 7-6 (4), 6-1 loss to Denisa Allertova of the Czech Republic.

Ivanovic is a former No. 1 player and 2008 French Open winner who has slipped to No. 31 in the rankings.

The Serb was serving for the first set at 6-5 but struggled with her serve and faltered in the tiebreaker. She finished with seven double-faults and 41 unforced errors.

At the Open, she has reached the fourth round or better five times, including a career-best quarterfinal run in 2012.

The 89th-ranked Allertova improved to 7-1 in first-round matches in majors, making her second main-draw appearance at the Open.

12:30 p.m.

Simona Halep gave herself “less than 9” for her quick work in Kirsten Flipkens 6-0, 6-2 in the first match on Arthur Ashe Stadium.

The Romanian was ahead 6-0, 5-0 with countrywoman Nadia Comaneci cheering her on. Comaneci was the first gymnast to score a perfect 10 at the 1976 Montreal Olympics.

Halep says she wasn’t perfect, but pleased with how she played against the Belgian. She got 69 percent of her first serves in and won 12 of 15 points at the net.

Halep, who reached the semifinals of the U.S. Open last year, will next face Lucie Safarova, a 6-4, 6-4 winner over Daria Gavrilova.

Venus and Serena Williams are among the featured matches on Arthur Ashe Stadium at the U.S. Open.

Venus will take on Kateryna Kozlova of Ukraine in the afternoon Tuesday before her top-ranked sister plays Ekaterina Makarova of Russia in the night match at the stadium with the new retractable roof.

Serena has been bothered by a shoulder injury, playing only three matches since winning Wimbledon for her 22nd Grand Slam title. She faces a tough opening opponent in Makarova, who beat her at the 2012 Australian Open.

Kirsten Flipkens of Belgium and Simona Halep of Romania have started play on Ashe, followed by Fernando Verdasco of Spain against Stan Wawrinka of Switzerland.

Andy Murray of Britain will face Lukas Rosol of the Czech Republic in the other evening match.

Information from The Associated Press contributed to this report.

New look: Murray, Kerber start Australian Open as top seeds

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MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) It’s new and exciting for Andy Murray and Angelique Kerber, entering a Grand Slam tournament with the No. 1 in front of their names.

Both reached the top of the rankings for the first time near the end of 2016, ending long reigns by Novak Djokovic and Serena Williams.

And so they’ll open their Australian Open campaigns on Rod Laver Arena on day one – both against Ukrainians.

Murray, a five-time runner-up, opens his pursuit of a first Australian title against Illya Marchenko in the last day match on the main show court. Kerber opens the night session against Lesia Tsurenko. She’ll be followed on court by Roger Federer, who is returning from six months on the sidelines.

The `one-round-at-a-time’ cliche is well worn in tennis. For Kerber, though, it’s pertinent. Seeded seventh last year, the left-handed German had to save a match point in the first round against Misaki Doi. Spurred on by that, she went on to beat Serena Williams in the final and claim her first Grand Slam title. She added a second major at the U.S. Open and ascended to the No 1 ranking.

“I think this point where I was match point down, that was the important point for my career,” Kerber said Sunday, speaking of her first-round escape against Doi. “You never know (if) I lost the match, what would have happened.”

It gave her the freedom to play without pressure, and that made all the difference.

“When I’m looking back, I was feeling that I got a second chance to stay in the tournament,” she said. “I was playing since then without expectation … just enjoying everything.”

Kerber can hang on to the top ranking by reaching to the final here, but she’s already feeling there’s more to defend than her title.

“It’s a new challenge for me, for sure,” she said. But, “We are starting from zero here. I have to be ready from the first round again.

“I will try to not put too much expectation and pressure on myself. I mean, I will try to do it like last year – that was the way I had my success.”

Record-chasing, six-time champions Djokovic and Williams, seeded No. 2 and anchoring the bottom half of the men’s and women’s draws, won’t be in action until day two. Djokovic is aiming to be the first man to win seven Australian titles. Serena Williams is chasing an Open-era record 23rd major title.

Newly-engaged Williams hasn’t wanted to talk about the record, being a little bit superstitious. Williams is concentrating on her first-round match against Belinda Bencic, who was seeded 12th here last year and who beat her in Toronto in 2015.

While Serena has to wait, the Williams family will be represented on Rod Laver Arena on Monday by her older sister, Venus. The 13th-seeded Venus Williams will play against Kateryna Kozlova following fourth-seeded Simona Halep’s opener against Shelby Rogers.

French Open champion Garbine Muguruza starts play on Margaret Court Arena against Marina Erakovic, and U.S. Open champion Stan Wawrinka opens the night session on the second show court.

Fifth-seeded Kei Nishikori gets things underway against Andrey Kuznetsov on Hisense Arena, where Nick Kyrgios will make his return to the tour against Gastao Elias.

The 21-year-old Kyrgios finished 2016 under a ban in a season overshadowed by clashes with officials and fans and by the tanking at the Shanghai Masters which led to an eight-week suspension.

The ban was reduced to three weeks when Kyrgios agreed to consult a sports psychologist, allowing to warmup for the Australian Open at the Hopman Cup.

That’s where Federer made his return from six months out to give his injured left knee time to heal. The 17-time major winner didn’t play after Wimbledon and his ranking slid to No. 17 by this week. That resulted in him getting a tougher draw than usual at the tournament he has won four times, and where he has reached the semifinals in 12 of the last 13 years. If results go with rankings, he’ll play two qualifiers before a potential third-round match against No. 10 Tomas Berdych. Nishikori and Murray are also in his quarter.

Federer will open against another 35-year-old veteran, former No. 8-ranked Jurgen Melzer.

“That’s the part of the draw I care most about because of having not been playing,” Federer said.

Wild-card entry Destanee Aiava, a 16-year-old Melbourne high school student, is set to become the first player born in this millennium to play a main draw match at a Grand Slam when she meets German qualifier Mona Barthel on Show Court 2.

Andy Murray confident he can break Aussie drought

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 14:  Andy Murray of Scotland serves during a practice session ahead of the 2017 Australian Open at Melbourne Park on January 14, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia.  (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)
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MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) Andy Murray has become a father, gained the No. 1 ranking and received a knighthood since he left Melbourne Park 50 weeks ago after losing a fifth Australian Open final.

Stress weighed him down at the season-opening Grand Slam in 2016, to the point where he thought about quitting the tournament to head back to Britain to be with his heavily pregnant wife. But even that would have presented problems, considering his father-in-law was in a Melbourne hospital after collapsing with an illness while watching a match at the Australian Open.

Clearly, he’s in a better place this year as he seeks to end his Australian drought.

“I obviously feel pretty confident after the way that last season finished,” he said. “I do love it here. I love the conditions. I have played really well here over the years, and just haven’t managed to get over the final hurdle.

“But, yeah, I think I’m in a decent position, for sure, to do it. I think I have a chance to win here. I’m playing well. Practice has been good. I feel healthy. I’ll give it a good shot.”

Rumors circulated last year that Murray would go home before facing Djokovic, his Melbourne nemesis, in the final. As it was, he was on the first flight to Heathrow after losing in straight sets – his fourth Australian Open final defeat to Djokovic and fifth overall dating back to 2010. His wife, Kim Sears, gave birth to their first child, Sophia Olivia, the following week.

He confirmed Saturday, two days before he opens the 2017 tournament against Illya Marchenko of Ukraine, that he really had thought about leaving early.

“It was a tough tournament, obviously the situation with Kim and the baby coming was tough,” he said. “Then with what happened with Nigel during the event made it really kind of awkward because there was times … it was like `I want to home for the birth,’ but then I’m not just going to leave while my father-in-law is also in hospital.

“It was tough, and certainly not a position I would want to put myself in again, or my wife, or any of my family really.”

Murray had a stunning end to 2016 after reuniting with Ivan Lendl as coach in June, winning his second Wimbledon title, defending his Olympic gold medal, and adding titles in Beijing, Shanghai, Vienna and Paris to end Djokovic’s 122-week stint at No. 1.

He then clinched the year-end No. 1 ranking by winning the ATP Finals, beating the players seeded second, third, fourth and fifth.

He set a record for most time between gaining the No. 2 and No. 1 rankings – seven years, and 82 days. But he has set a lot of timely records for British tennis in the last three seasons and, in Queen Elizabeth II’s New Year’s honors list, he received a knighthood from the British monarch for reaching the pinnacle of the sport.

Roger Federer was asked if he could remember what it was like back in 2004 when he first became No. 1, and how he’d explain it to Murray.

“It definitely feels different because everybody comes up to you and says, `You’re the best,'” said Federer, who spent a record 302 weeks at No. 1. “You start walking around a bit differently. Just feel more confident overall in your shots.”

Murray said he hasn’t really felt a difference yet, but it has only been eight weeks. Considering how hard it was to achieve the top spot, he’s hoping it doesn’t take twice the energy to hang on to it.

“It is a mindset thing, because I think it could be quite easy that once you get to No. 1 that you think, `Well, actually, I just need to keep doing what I’ve been doing,'” he said. “The reality is that things obviously keep moving on, the game will get better, I’ll obviously get older, the young guys will continue to improve, and also Novak and Roger and Stan (Wawrinka) and Rafa (Nadal) and all the guys at the top are still going to be wanting to get there.

“I need to continue to improve. I for sure need to keep working hard.”

One thing he doesn’t really want to change is how people refer to him now that formally he’s recognized as Sir Andy Murray, particularly the broadcasters.

“I’m more than happy just being Andy. That’s enough for me,” he said. “Yeah, if they call me Andy, I’d be happy with that.”