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Jimmy Feigen apologizes for ‘serious distraction’ in Rio

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NEW YORK — U.S. swimmer James Feigen apologized for the “serious distraction” he and three teammates caused at a gas station during the Rio Olympics, saying he omitted facts in his statement to police.

“I omitted the facts that we urinated behind the building and that Ryan Lochte pulled a poster off the wall,” Feigen said in a statement Tuesday on the website of his lawyer in Austin, Texas.

He maintains the group didn’t force their way into a bathroom and a gun was pointed at them.

Feigen said the group left the French House party around 5 a.m. in a taxi to travel back to the Athlete Village.

“We pulled over to a gas station to use the bathroom but the door was locked,” Feigen’s statement read. “We did not force entry into the bathroom, nor did we ever enter the bathroom. We did, however, make the regrettable decision to urinate in the grass behind the building.”

Feigen said he paid the driver the cab fare and “As I walked away, the man with the gun pointed it at me and my teammate and ordered us, in Portuguese, to sit.”

Feigen said it “became apparent that the man with the gun was telling us to pay,” and he and teammate Gunnar Bentz gave the man some money. They took another cab to the village and arrived around 7 a.m.

Feigen, who was pulled off an airplane last week by Brazilian police for more questioning, said he paid a fine of $10,800 for return of his passport so he could travel back to the U.S.

Americans dark horses for most golds in Winter Olympics betting futures

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While Germany and Norway were 1-2 in gold medals the last time that a Winter Games was held in Asia, the reality of a reduced Russian presence is why the two European nations are expected to do so again at the 2018 Winter Olympics.

With the Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea, due to officially begin on Friday, Norway is a narrow +150 favorite with Germany a +160 second favorite on the most gold medals futures board, according to sportsbooks monitored by The countries are each listed at +175 to garner the most medals overall.

In gold medal props, the United States (+500) and Canada (+700) are the high-value outside shots. The prices are similar in overall medals futures: United States +400 and Canada +500.

The main question is how much Russia being marginalized due to doping scandals – it has been allowed to keep 29 medals from Sochi 2014, but the Olympic Athletes From Russia team will be lucky to reach half that – will open opportunities for other leading nations.

The working theory for taking Norway in either prop is the Scandinavian nation’s consistency – a minimum of nine golds in five of the last six Winter Olympics – and its depth in the few sports its masters. Norway is a lock to dominate cross-country skiing, while alpine skiers Kjetil Jansrud and Askel Lund Svindal will duel for downhill and super-G hardware.

A similar case can be made with Germany, which won the most golds during two of the last five Winter Olympics (Nagano 1998 and Torino 2006). Biathlete Laura Dahlmeier, with her primary rival dropping out, could be Phelps-on-snow with a chance at six gold medals. Germany is also poised to dominate the sliding center, with projections of a four-gold sweep in luge and two strong sleds in two-man and four-man bobsled.

With the Americans’ spread of talent across all 15 Winter Games sports and 102 events, the United States is worth a value play to win the most gold medals. The over/under on American golds is 10.5, which is certainly attainable, especially if the women’s hockey team, a -120 favorite against even-money Canada, is able to get the gold.

The over/under on golds for Canada is 8.5, but America’s northern neighbor has only exceeded the threshold twice, in 2010 and 2014. Between the NHL sitting out the men’s hockey competition and key injuries to stars – defending women’s ski cross champion Marielle Thompson hasn’t raced all winter and world champion alpine skier Erik Guay is out due to injury – it might be best to fade the Canadians.

For more odds info, picks and a breakdown of this week’s top sports betting news check out the OddsShark podcast with Jon Campbell and Andrew Avery. Subscribe on iTunes, or check it out at

WATCH: Relive Usain Bolt’s three Olympic gold medal runs in 100m

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Usain Bolt makes it look easy.

In the 2008 Beijing Olympics, Bolt was a precocious 21-year-old that begged his coach to let him run in both the 100- and 200-meter sprint. Even at the ripe young age of 21, fans watched in awe and anticipation as Usain ‘Lighting’ Bolt took off, winning “by daylight.”

Four years later at the 2012 London Olympic games, Bolt did it again. He exploded off the block, sprinting his way to victory in order to keep his title as the king of the 100-meter sprint.

At the 2016 Rio Olympics fans watched on as Bolt took a different approach to winning. He didn’t blow away the field right away as per usual. He watched Justin Gatlin pull ahead to a sizable lead. Yet, in typical Bolt fashion, he ran Gatlin down, winning the 100-meter sprint, keeping up his image of impenetrability.

Throughout Bolt’s career his consistency and drive have never wavered. It doesn’t matter who has the lead, if there’s a will, there’s a way with Bolt.

An incredible athlete and an even better showman, Bolt’s retirement leaves a gaping hole to be filled. Every time the gun goes off and the fans roar, Bolt is ready to perform. It’s as if the roar of the crowd energizes Bolt, propelling him forward as he sprints his way to victory, time and time again.