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4-time champ Wozniacki exits Connecticut Open in 1st round

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NEW HAVEN, Conn. —¬†Caroline Wozniacki entered the Connecticut Open as a wild card, hoping a tournament she has won four times would help her tune up for the U.S. Open.

Instead, the former top-ranked player from Denmark saw her struggles continue in a 7-5, 6-2 first-round loss to Jelena Ostapenko of Latvia on Monday.

“It’s been a really weird year for me, something I’m not used to,” said Wozniacki, who has dealt with injuries all year.

“It’s frustrating when you practice well and can’t really execute in the matches. … At least when I know when I’m playing my best level, if someone beats me, that’s fine. But what’s frustrating is when you’re not playing your best and then you get beat.”

Wozniacki, now ranked 51st, was coming off a second-round loss to Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic at the Olympics.

Kvitova advanced Monday night with a 1-6, 6-1, 6-3 win over American Louisa Chirico. She will next face Eugenie Bouchard, a 6-2, 6-1 winner over Annika Beck of Germany.

No. 20 Elena Vesnina also advanced with a 6-1, 6-4 win over Camila Giorgi of Italy.

Top-seeded Agnieszka Radwanska was to have met Wozniacki in the second round. Instead, Radwanska, ranked No. 5, will face Ostapenko, 19, who reached the final at Doha in February and won the Wimbledon junior girls tournament in 2014.

Against Wozniacki, Ostapenko staved off a set point in the first set, won four straight games to close out the set and never looked back.

“After that, the match turned the other way,” Ostapenko said of her service breaks. “She’s a great player … so I just played like I had nothing to lose.”

Wozniacki’s early exit leaves the tournament with four players in the WTA’s Top 20 – Radwanska of Poland, Vesnina of Russia, Kvitova of the Czech Republic and second-seeded Roberta Vinci of Italy.

In other matches Monday, Anastasija Sevastova of Latvia, Caroline Garcia of France, Evgeniya Rodina of Russia, Annet Kontaveit of Estonia and Ana Konjuh of Croatia all advanced to the second round.

Top-seeded John Isner wins 3rd Hall of Fame title

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NEWPORT, R.I. — Top-seeded John Isner beat Australian qualifier Matthew Ebden 6-3, 7-6 (4) on Sunday for his third Hall of Fame Open title.

The hard-serving American also won the grass-court event in 2011 and 2012. He has 11th career titles, all at the ATP World Tour 250 level.

“It’s hard to win a tournament,” Isner said. “It’s no small feat to come out here and be the last man standing. I’m very happy about that. It’s been two years since I won a tournament, so I had that weighing on my mind.”

Isner became the second player to win an ATP title without facing a break point since records began in 1991. Tommy Haas also accomplished the feat in Memphis, Tennessee, in 2007.

“I’m very happy with how I played all week,” Isner said. “It was a perfect week and I couldn’t ask for anything better.”

Ebden was playing his first tour-level final.

“It’s a lot of reward for a lot of hard work, a lot of years of sacrifice,” Ebden said. “It’s disappointing, but at the same time I have to be happy with my week.”

Roddick, Clijsters among Tennis Hall of Fame inductees

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NEWPORT, R.I. — Andy Roddick says jokingly he can now keep Roger Federer from a unanimous selection for the International Tennis Hall of Fame.

As a new inductee, Roddick gets to vote on future candidates. He jested ahead of his enshrinement on Saturday that he’ll use it to get back at Federer, who stood in his way during at least four Grand Slam finals.

Roddick joins inductees Kim Clijsters, six-time Paralympic medalist Monique Kalkman and journalist and historian Steve Flink. Tennis instructor and innovator Vic Braden was to be inducted posthumously.

Roddick won one Grand Slam and lost to Federer in the finals four times. He says he doesn’t ask himself what would have happened if he hadn’t come along at the same time of perhaps the greatest player.

He says the first text he got when he woke up Saturday was from Federer. Says Roddick: “He makes it extremely hard not to like him as a person.”