The Running Decathlon: Track Town, The Netherlands

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Kelly Hayes, a spotter on NBC’s Sunday Night Football, is attempting to to complete “The Running Decathlon” which consists of the ten most widely-run track events. His goal is to run each race “half as fast,” or in twice the time, of the current world record in each event. And he will attempt to run these races in the footsteps of those who set the records on the very tracks, and in the very stadiums where the records were set.

His “quest” serves as a platform to raise funds to purchase a $90,000 exoskeleton Bionic Suit, which allows those with critical spinal injuries to rise from their wheelchairs and actually take assisted walks. Think Tony Stark from Ironman. He is relying on donations to the Bridging Bionics Foundation to make this a reality.

Follow Kelly on his journey, which begins in Rome on July 7, 2016, here, on Facebook, Twitter and at race2walk2016.com where you can make a 100 percent tax-deductible contribution towards the purchase of an exoskeleton Bionic Suit for the Bridging Bionics Foundation. One hundred percent of your donations will go towards the purchase of these suits.

Please turn Kelly’s steps into dollars. And we will turn dollars into steps for those who want to walk again.

On a cool May afternoon in 2004, more than 15,000 people packed the stands and lawn hillsides at the Fanny Blankers-Koen Stadion in Hengelo, Netherlands. The track savvy crowd had come to see Kenenisa Bekele attempt to break the world record in the 5000m, or 5K, which was held by fellow Ethiopian, and Bekele’s mentor, Haile Gebrselassie.

Among those there that day to witness the fastest 5K ever were race starter Bennie Oude Engerink, who fired the opening gun, and timekeeper/jury member Marion Witvoet.  Aikio Staudt and Lars van der Pluym, both teenagers, were in the stands as fans.

Twelve years later, all returned at the long revamped FBK Stadion to participate as I attempted to run “half as fast” as Bekele in an attempt to complete the third event of my “Running Decathlon.”

The FBK Stadion in Hengelo is a track and field only facility that plays host annually to the IAAF meet called, naturally, the FBK Games. Thanks to a relationship with a Dutch agent, African runners from Ethiopia and Kenya have always been a part of this meet, and the times in the 1500m, 5000m and 10000m have been very fast. The stadium was named for the Dutch Olympic great who, as a mother of two, won four Gold Medals in the 1948 London Games. As a result of all of this, the Hengelo fans are amongst the most avid and knowledgeable track and field fans on the planet.

As I took the track on a cool and overcast morning, I felt that I had a good chance to run the 25:14 that I needed to achieve my self-set goal of twice the time as Bekele’s world record. My hopes were buoyed when Lars, who had been in the stands that day in 2004, showed up in a Jim Morrison T-shirt to pace me. An accomplished club decathlete, Lars has run sub 20 minute 5ks and was a worthy rabbit, and his English was solid enough for conversation during the 12-and-a-half lap trip.

My goal, which was pretty pedestrian, was to go out in a: 60 200m and then settle into a 2:00 per lap pace, finishing at 25:00 even, just ahead of my goal. As the gun sounded, I jumped on the turn, perhaps a touch too quick (well too quick by my 60 year old standards), and we hit the 200 mark in a bit over :40. “Lets just slow it down a bit,” Lars counseled and we fell into a slow groove.

Lars had asked before the run if I had wanted to chat along the way, or if that would be a distraction. I told him I wanted to focus, so if he wanted to talk that would be fine, but don’t expect too much conversation. Of course, that went out the window on lap one when he told me he was a mad fan of the NBA.

LeBron was his man, he said, the Cavaliers his team, and he derided Golden State’s Splash Brothers and their three-point play. That led me to tell him the story of Steve Kerr, the coach of the Warriors, who attended my High School, Palisades, before matriculating to the University of Arizona. Two laps later, I had finished the tale of how Kerr’s father had been assassinated in Beirut, Lebanon, by terrorists when Kerr was a freshman Wildcat and how he had hit six straight 3-pointers in response to the Arizona State students disgusting chants of “PLO” and “Your father is history” before the game. It is a story that has always inspired me, one that I tell often, and it was powerful telling it one more time on this run.

As we completed the second mile, I was felling pretty strong and our times were getting a bit faster with each lap. I thought of the video of Bekele’s record-breaking run that I had watched many times before the race, and how he had sprinted so hard on the final laps, and I thought, “We should give this thing a go.” Lars was ready and on the 11th lap we dipped under 1:50.

As the bell rang (I just loved it that the equipment men had brought out the bell and the lap clock for the run), we kicked into gear. Earlier in the week, Tim Burr had written a post for the Race2Walk2016 blog about how everyone has challenges, and that the key was in how you approached them. Again inspired, I took off.  “I can smell the barn,” said Lars as we hit the backstretch.

At this time, I knew I would be under my time so a sense of relief overcame me, but, as has been the case since this whole thing started, I was once again overwhelmed by just how fortunate I was to be able to run like this. Maybe not so fast, but fast enough to be in the game, running in competition, even if only with myself at the age of 60. This whole crazy scheme was actually happening and I was sprinting to the finish.

As I saw the clock and the finish line, the small crew of track fans and officials who had come out on a Friday morning for a look cheered me on. I crossed to their applause, satisfied that I had, once again, fooled ‘em and crushed the time to beat with a last lap time of :97 and a final clocking of 24:14.97.

It’s good to be 60.

Nassar victim: Michigan State leader offered secret payoff

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LANSING, Mich. – A sexual assault victim of former sports doctor Larry Nassar confronted Michigan State University officials on Friday, alleging the school’s interim leader offered a payoff to settle her lawsuit and pressured her to do so without her attorney present.

Kaylee Lorincz spoke during a contentious board of trustees meeting, where interim President John Engler expressed regret over the university’s response to another woman’s federal lawsuit over the schools handling of rape allegations involving basketball players. Lorincz, who has said Larry Nassar sexually assaulted her when she sought treatment for back pain, said Engler and his attorney offered her $250,000 when the teen and her mother were at the school a few weeks ago to sign up to speak at Friday’s meeting.

According to Lorincz, Engler said to her, “Right now if I wrote you a check for $250,000 would you take it?”

Lorincz said Engler also claimed another Nassar victim had given him an amount she would consider to settle with the university. Lorincz said she felt “bullied” by the encounter.

Engler didn’t immediately respond to her comments. His spokeswoman, Emily Guerrant, said she was in the room during the conversation and does not remember Engler offering a dollar figure.

“My interpretation of the discussion was not that he was saying, `I’m offering you $250,000,”‘ she said. “It was a discussion about the civil litigation and how it was going on.”

Lorincz addressed Engler in a room brimming with protesters, parents and sexual assault victims of Nassar, now serving decades in prison for molesting women and girls and for possessing child pornography. Lorincz was among roughly 250 women who gave statements earlier this year during Nassar’s sentencing hearings in two Michigan courtrooms.

In a separate case, a woman filed a lawsuit Monday saying the university’s counselors discouraged her from filing a police report after three Michigan State basketball players allegedly raped her in 2015. She accuses the school of violating Title IX protocol and claims staff made it clear that “she faced an uphill battle that would create anxiety and unwanted media attention” should she report her rape.

The university’s immediate response to reporters asking about the lawsuit was to decline comment. But on Wednesday it issued a lengthy statement that detailed staff interaction with the woman.

The university faced criticism over that response from people who say it violated privacy laws.

Engler acknowledged Friday that the school “provided an unnecessary amount of detail” about the case, saying some people saw the response as “violating privacy expectations.”

Engler became interim president after Lou Anna Simon resigned in January hours after Nassar was sentenced to decades in prison for crimes involving Michigan State athletes. Students remain anxious over the future course of the university, which has yet to choose a permanent replacement for Simon.

In Friday’s board meeting, Engler attempted to steer focus toward celebrating milestones of the university’s graduating seniors but was frequently usurped by boos and jeers from a crowd clad in teal shirts with the phrase, “I stand with the sister survivors (hash)MeTooMSU.” Some Nassar victims wrapped their mouths with black bands that had the phrase “Silenced” scrawled over them.

Parents of victims were left in the lobby downstairs because their posters of their children’s faces were considered “signs” and thus barred from the meeting room. Protesters who were able to attend instead held up cellphones with childhood pictures of victims.

During the meeting, Engler proposed a 2.97 percent tuition increase, the third lowest in 20 years. Earlier he had teased the possibility of heavy tuition increases should the school’s lawsuits over the Nassar controversy continue to snowball financially.

During public testimony, Engler and his board were castigated for how he handled the public fallout over the past few months and repeatedly told to resign.

“You sponsored my assault,” dancer Morgan McCaul, a Nassar victim, said. “Your time is up. Resign.”

As McCaul’s testimony concluded, the crowd joined her in chanting, “Shame on you,” at the board.

Sportscaster Dick Enberg dies at 82

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SAN DIEGO — Dick Enberg, the longtime sportscaster who got his big break with UCLA basketball and went on to call Super Bowls, Olympics, Final Fours and Angels and Padres baseball games, died Thursday. He was 82.

Engberg’s daughter, Nicole, confirmed the death to The Associated Press. She said the family became concerned when he didn’t arrive on his flight to Boston on Thursday, and that he was found dead at his home in La Jolla, a San Diego neighborhood, with his bags packed.

“He was dressed with his bags packed at the door,” wife Barbara told the Union-Tribune. “We think it was a heart attack.”

Enberg retired in October 2016 after a 60-year career – and countless calls of “Oh my!” in describing a play that nearly defied description. He also was well-known for his baseball catchphrase of “Touch `em all” for home runs.

Raised in Armada, Michigan, Enberg’s first radio job was actually as a radio station custodian in Mount Pleasant, Michigan, when he was a junior at Central Michigan. He made $1 an hour. The owner also gave him weekend sports and disc jockey gigs, also at $1 an hour. From there he began doing high school and college football games.

During his nine years broadcasting UCLA basketball, the Bruins won eight NCAA titles. Enberg broadcast nine no-hitters, including two by San Francisco’s Tim Lincecum against the Padres in 2013 and 2014.

He said the most historically important event he covered was “The Game of the Century,” Houston’s victory over UCLA in 1968 that snapped the Bruins’ 47-game winning streak.

“That was the platform from which college basketball’s popularity was sent into the stratosphere,” Enberg said. “The `79 game, the Magic-Bird game, everyone wants to credit that as the greatest game of all time That was just the booster rocket that sent it even higher. … UCLA, unbeaten; Houston, unbeaten. And then the thing that had to happen, and Coach Wooden hated when I said this, but UCLA had to lose. That became a monumental event.”

Enberg’s many former broadcast partners included Merlin Olsen, Al McGuire, Billy Packer, Don Drysdale and Tony Gwynn. He even worked a few games with Wooden, whom he called “The greatest man I’ve ever known other than my own father.” Enberg called Padres games for seven seasons and went into the broadcasters’ wing of the Hall of Fame in 2015.

John Ireland, the radio voice of the Los Angeles Lakers, tweeted that “If there was a Mount Rushmore of LA Sports Announcers, Dick Enberg is on it with Chick Hearn, Vin Scully and Bob Miller. Rams, Angels, UCLA, NBC, and so much more. Was the first famous announcer I ever met, and he couldn’t have been nicer. Definition of a gentleman.”

Enberg won 13 Sports Emmy Awards and a Lifetime Achievement Emmy. He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and UCLA named its Media Center in Pauley Pavilion after Enberg this year.

“Kindest, most proactive possible treatment of newcomers in this business, for the length of his career,” broadcaster Keith Olbermann said of Enberg on Twitter. “What a terrible loss.”