Getty Images

Wimbledon Lookahead: Some players still stuck in 1st round

Leave a comment

LONDON — While Novak Djokovic – he of the 30-match Grand Slam winning streak – and Roger Federer can relax and enjoy their places in Wimbledon’s third round, there are more than two dozen players still stuck in the opening round.

That includes eight women who enter Thursday without having played a single point in the grass-court tournament thanks to plenty of rain, among them No. 11 Timea Bacsinszky and No. 31 Kristina Mladenovic.

While every man has at least started his first-round match, 12 head into Day 4 needing to complete those contests.

The top American man, 18th-seeded John Isner, has finished only one full set against Marcos Baghdatis, taking it in a tiebreaker. They are scheduled to resume Thursday – weather permitting, of course – with Baghdatis ahead 3-1 in the second.

Mikhail Youzhny and Horacio Zeballos are also in the second set of their first-round match.

And the list goes on and on.

In all, there are 28 players who are hoping to get out of the first round Thursday.

All of the wet weather wreaked so much havoc with the schedule that the first round of men’s doubles matches were reduced from best-of-five sets to best-of-three.

And the worst news of all? The long-range forecast shows there is a chance of rain every day through next Tuesday.

Here is what else to look for at Wimbledon on Thursday:

MURRAY’S TURN: No. 1 Djokovic and No. 3 Federer got to enjoy the protection of the Centre Court roof Wednesday and completed their matches while there was under two hours of play elsewhere on the grounds. No. 2 Andy Murray gets the same treatment Thursday. He’ll be playing his second-round match against 76th-ranked Yen-hsun Lu of Taiwan. Murray has lost only one match at any Grand Slam tournament to a player ranked that low, and it was more than a decade ago, against No. 91 Arnaud Clement at the 2005 U.S. Open.

WILLIAMS SISTERS: Serena and Venus Williams are scheduled to play doubles Thursday, part of their reunion tour this season before the Rio de Janeiro Olympics. In singles, though, six-time Wimbledon champion Serena gets the day off, while five-time champ Venus, who is seeded No. 8, takes on 115th-ranked Maria Sakkari in a second-round match. Sakkari will be trying to become the first Greek woman to reach the third round at a major since Eleni Daniilidou at Wimbledon in 2005.

BOUCHARD VS. KONTA: Two women who closed out rain-interrupted first-round victories Wednesday are back in action when No. 16 Johanna Konta – the first British woman seeded at the All England Club since Jo Durie in 1984 – faces 2014 Wimbledon runner-up Eugenie Bouchard.

 

French Open 2017: 30 is the new 25 in men’s tennis right now

Getty Images
Leave a comment

PARIS — The very top of men’s tennis has never been this old.

For the first time in the history of the ATP computer rankings, which date to the early 1970s, the men sitting at Nos. 1-5 are all 30 or older, the latest sign that the current crop of stars has enviable staying power.

It’s also the latest reason to wonder when a new face will emerge among the elite, because there eventually will come a point – yes, there really will – when the group that was once known as the Big 3, then came to be called the Big 4, and now is considered by some to be a Big 5, is no longer running the sport.

With the French Open starting Sunday, No. 1 Andy Murray, No. 2 Novak Djokovic, No. 3 Stan Wawrinka and No. 4 Rafael Nadal (No. 5 Roger Federer is skipping Paris) all have designs on another major trophy. But could someone such as Alexander Zverev, who just turned 20 last month, or the supremely talented – and supremely enigmatic – Nick Kyrgios, 22, or Dominic Thiem, 23, make a breakthrough for the up-and-coming kids?

“We’re probably coming to the end of one of the greatest eras of tennis that, certainly, I’ve ever seen,” ATP Executive Chairman and President Chris Kermode said, “and what we need to do as a sport is look to the next generation of players.”

Federer is 35, Wawrinka is 32, Nadal turns 31 on June 3, and Djokovic and Murray turned 30 this month. That quintet has won 46 of the last 48 Grand Slam titles, a dozen-year stretch of dominance.

Zverev’s victory over Djokovic in the Italian Open final last weekend might have symbolized coming change. Zverev was the first man born in the 1990s to win a Masters 1000 title, the youngest champ since Djokovic about a decade ago.

That title also pushed Zverev into the top 10, making him the youngest member since Juan Martin del Potro in 2008.

“It’s nice … for the tour, as well, to have a few younger guys, few younger girls, as well, to be able to play at the top,” said Zverev, who is German. “As I said many times, unfortunately for tennis and unfortunately for the spectators, the top four cannot play forever. So it’s good that younger players are starting to get through.”

So then the question becomes: Why has it taken so long?

Why does someone such as former player and coach Brad Gilbert, now an ESPN commentator, say, “Today’s 30 is like 25 used to be,” as he did this week? Why have these 30-somethings had such staying power? And why is it taking so long for newcomers to make a mark?

There is a similar situation in women’s tennis, where Serena Williams has kept winning Grand Slam titles into her 30s and is the oldest No. 1 in WTA history. Current No. 1 Angelique Kerber was the oldest woman to make her debut at that spot.

“Tennis has changed in the last 15 years … since they slowed down surfaces and there is not much difference in speeds of the surfaces,” said Patrick Mouratoglou, Williams’ coach. “You rarely have many easy shots now. You have to work the points much more, and one of the consequences is you need to be physically much better and able to play long rallies.”

He points out that when Wimbledon’s grass courts, for example, used to play much faster than they do now, a player could succeed there hitting aces by the dozen and going for one winner after another, because “you don’t need the same maturity and understanding of tactics” that are required today.

Gilbert points to Andre Agassi – a man he used to coach, and who is assisting Djokovic during this French Open – as an inspiration to the current old-timers still in charge.

“It used to be, you turned 30, you were completely on the downside of your career. A lot of these guys can remember Andre making a deep run at 2005 at 35 years old. I think that was the turning point in belief, that guys could play a lot longer,” Gilbert said. “You’re seeing Tom Brady be the best quarterback in all of football, maybe ever, and he’s approaching 40, which is dinosaur for a quarterback, but not anymore. Athletes are pushing the envelope all year round. There’s no offseason. Offseason is for more training, diet, technology.”

Nadal leads Djokovic, Murray, Thiem on French Open odds

Leave a comment

The overarching presence of Rafael Nadal, who has won a record nine times at Roland Garros, has inflated prices on the other top men at the French Open.

Nadal is listed as a better than even money -125 favorite on the French Open men’s champion board at sportsbooks monitored by OddsShark.com. The Spaniard has won 17 of 18 matches on clay this year and will not have to worry about longtime nemesis Roger Federer, who’s saving himself for the grass and hard courts. The event begins in Paris on Sunday.

While Nadal is undoubtedly the most consistent clay-court player in the world, many threats loom. Novak Djokovic (+300) might be ready to come out of his lull now that he has swapped out his support staff, bringing on Andre Agassi as a personal coach. Nadal and Djokovic are on the same side of the draw, so either would benefit if the other falls prey to an upset.

Dominic Thiem (+900) could also be undervalued, given that he defeated Nadal in the Italian Open, one of the tune-ups for the French.

Top seed Andy Murray (+900) has not won an event on clay this season and his place on the tennis betting lines might reflect the notion that some bettors will always go for a big name with a track record of winning Grand Slams. In terms of someone who is coming into the tournament playing well, Stan Wawrinka (+1000) has had an impressive run at the Geneva Open after having so-so output for most of the clay-court season. Wawrinka is also a recent champion, having won in 2015.

It seems like it is just a matter of when 20-year-old Alexander Zverev (+1400) will win his first Grand Slam singles title. Zverev turned heads when he extended Nadal to five sets in a third-round defeat at the Australian Open in January, and he defeated Djokovic in the Italian Open final to become the youngest player in 10 years to win an ATP Masters event.

As far as the women’s champion board goes, Simona Halep (+450) has top odds but is battling an ankle injury. World No. 1 Angelique Kerber (+1600) has also been inconsistent throughout the season. Young Ukrainian Elina Svitolina (+700) is an intriguing possibility by virtue of her results (four singles titles already in 2017) and her strong return game, since the soft clay at Roland Garros dictates having longer rallies.

Garbine Muguruza (+900) is the defending champion, but it’s a little glaring that she has not reached a Grand Slam semifinal in three tries since that 2016 breakthrough.