WWE

NXT Takeover The End recap: It’s Samoa Joe’s world and we’re just living in it

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For the 11th time WWE’s developmental brand, NXT, “took over” the WWE Network and put on yet another excellent live special.

Was this NXT’s best Takeover special?

No.

Was it an awesome wrestling show?

yep

Got ya! I know you were expecting a Daniel Bryan gif.

The show kicked off with the debut of Andrade “Cien” Almas (formally known as La Sombra) against “The Perfect 10” Tye Dillinger.

Dillinger is so over. It got to a point where I thought that Almas was going to get booed, but ACA quickly showed why he’s a perfect fit for this roster. His lucha libre style is unique to NXT and to boot, he has a look that is tailor-made for the main roster.

The spot where Almas did a headstand on the top turnbuckle and Dillinger superkicked him was awesome spot number two of 783 on this show. The crowd totally bought that as a legit finish.

Awesome spot number one was Almas performing a moonsault from the second rope, landing on his feet and then hitting a standing moonsault.

Almas got the win after hitting his finish, which is a running double knee strike to a seated opponent in the corner. It looks very dangerous and can be done to anyone. So it’s a great finisher.

Three ½ stars out of five

American Alpha (C) vs. The Revival

So let me start off by saying this was the best match on the show. These four individuals made magic happen in the ring in front of a rabid audience at Full Sail University.

It shouldn’t have come as a surprise because they also had an incredible match at Takeover: Dallas, but this one was a bit cleaner and featured so many believable false finishes, that I legitimately had no idea when the finish was coming.

There were also so many awesome double team spots:

– A double ankle lock by AA.

– A dropkick-German suplex combo by AA.

– An incredibly dangerous spot where Dash Wilder had Chad Gable in a position to deliver a powerbomb closeline combo with Scott Dawson, only for Gable to reverse into a belly-to-belly suplex. It could have ended so badly.

After Jason Jordan ran wild and proved why he’s the treasurer of Suplex City, AA was in position to retain their NXT tag titles, but Gable was tossed out of the ring and The Revival hit the Shatter Machine and pinned Jordan clean in the middle to become NXT’s first two-time tag team champions.

After The Revival headed to the back, American Alpha was standing in the ring soaking in the applause from the crowd when the Authors of Pain made their surprising debut and wiped out Jordan and Gable. The team is made up of Sunny Dhisna and Gzim Selmani, two huge guys who can actually move.

And then out of nowhere Paul Ellering (!!!), the Legion of Doom’s former manager, showed up on the entrance ramp and walked away with the new duo.

Four ¾ stars out of five

The beauty of these NXT Takeover shows is that the card doesn’t usually have the “popcorn” filler matches that are strategically placed to bring the crowd down, so they can come back up later on in the show. There isn’t time to take a break, which is exactly what happened after the tag match because it was time for Austin Aries vs. Shinsuke Nakamura.

Nakamura’s entrance is just incredible and got even better because the crowd started singing along and continued to do so after the music ended (a la Sami Zayn). They continued to do it during the match as a way to pick up Nakamura after Aries beating down on him for a solid chunk of time.

This was the best that Aries has looked in NXT and it wasn’t just because he was in the ring with the “King of Strong Style,” AA was physical and sharp. The Death Valley Driver he delivered to Nakamura on the ring apron looked BRUTAL and then he followed it up with a suicide dive right into the barricade.

But the real star here is Swagsuke.

swagsuke

His offense is hard-hitting, his selling is spot on and his personality can fill up any arena. He’s going to be a gigantic babyface on the main roster and on top of that, he’s going to be a legitimate star.

Nakamura ended the match with the KINSHASAAAAAAAA and appears to be on his way to a program with Samoa Joe, which will be an awesome main event at Takeover: Brooklyn.

Four ½ stars out of five

The crowd came down a bit for the NXT Women’s Championship match between Nia Jax and Asuka (C), but the two had the crowd invested by the end.

While Nia Jax is the butt of quite a few jokes on the Internet, this was her best performance to date. The size difference between Jax and Asuka really made this match stand out because Asuka is shorter than almost every other women on the NXT roster (Hi, Alexa Bliss!). It’s not every day that you see multiple high impact power spots in a women’s match and Jax delivered them with confidence.

Asuka once again proved why she’s the best in-ring performer in the women’s division. The quick transitions into submissions were just beautiful and her strikes looked vicious especially in the finishing sequence of the match.

The champ kicked Jax four times in the head and then pinned her to retain the title. This was great because after the third kick, Jax let out a primal scream, only to get drilled by a Shining Wizard.

It looked like Asuka legit rocked Jax with the first front kick to the left side of the head.

Four stars out of five

There was a backstage interview with William Regal that was shot earlier in the day. As Regal was talking, Bobby Roode walked behind Regal and went into his office. A production assistant whispered something to Regal and he promptly left the interview.

Main event time!

Samoa Joe (C) vs. Finn Balor

For the first time in NXT history a steel cage match took place as Samoa Joe defended the NXT title for the first time since he defeated Balor at a house show in Lowell, Massachusetts last month.

Balor entered in his “demon” paint, complete with a great entrance where he appeared behind a cage wall that was set up on the entrance way. He then knocked it down and crawled over top of it on his way to the ring.

The two had a very physical match. I got yelled at by The Roommate for freaking out when Balor legitimately soccer kicked Joe RIGHT IN THE FACE.

Totally worth it.

I thought the two used the cage really well here. There were multiple times where someone was either thrown into the cage (usually Balor) or trapped in between the ropes and the cage (Joe). They both teased going out of the door and Balor almost climbed out of the cage multiple times.

Balor kicked out of a muscle buster and then Joe kicked out of the Coup de Grace. In a nice throwback spot to their match at Takeover: Dallas, Joe locked the Coquina Clutch, but Balor ran up the turnbuckles and flipped over to break out of the hold.

After this sequence, Balor did a standing double foot stomp on Joe and then started climbing up the cage to escape, but Joe grabbed his foot and eventually slammed Balor’s face into the cage and hit a TOP ROPE MUSCLE BUSTER to pin Balor and end the “demon’s” undefeated streak (Balor hadn’t lost while wearing his body paint).

Four out of five stars.

Hot take: I wasn’t the biggest fan of the main event. I appreciated the physicality of the match as the two always beat the hell out of each other when they’re in the ring together, but I thought they’re previous two bouts were better.

Quick power rankings of their three matches:

  • Dallas
  • London
  • Full Sail

After the match Joe walked up the ramp as the trainers attended to Balor in the ring and Tom Phillips gave the hard sell as the show went off of the air.

Overall it was a wonderful show. I did leave the show wanting more due to the comments by HHH earlier in the week. Hunter stated that the name of the show (Takeover: The End) would have multiple meanings, so of course as a wrestling fan I’m going to shoot for the moon and assume that we were going to witness absolute chaos.

Well we didn’t get that, but we did get an awesome two hours of wrestling, so everyone should have gone home happy.

Twitter: @ScottDargis

Paul ‘Triple H’ Levesque’s quest to change WWE as we know it

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Paul Levesque, aka “Triple H”, has evolved from one of the top performers of his generation, to a prominent role behind the scenes as the Executive Vice President of Talent, Live Events and Creative for WWE. I had the chance to chat with “HHH” about what he specifically looks for when he’s recruiting new talent, why this past year has been so challenging for NXT and how he presents new talent to Vince McMahon. 

(Don’t miss NXT Takeover: Orlando on Saturday, April 1 at 8 p.m. ET Live on WWE Network)

Me: You’ve had an incredible in-ring career; a 14-time world champion. As I look up and down the WrestleMania 33 card I see so many NXT alums and I wonder, what did you learn from your time as a performer that has helped you as an evaluator of talent?

Paul “HHH” Levesque: “Oh man … everything that I’ve learned since I’ve walked through the door. The funny thing for me is that I’ve been in a unique position during my career. I was fascinated early with the behind the scenes and production aspects of the business.

So, shortly after I came to WWE I was in creative conversations with Vince that led to me to being offered to come to production meetings, which I didn’t have to go to. I would get up early on TV days and go to these production meetings that I didn’t need to be a part of. People thought I was crazy, but I wasn’t trying to do anything more than learn. I wanted to learn what they were looking for.

The vision of what the talent thinks they want and what the office thinks they want are sometimes two different things.

I have the unique perspective of having both sides and that allows me to I think look at talent a different way, but to also to be able to say here’s what you need to be able to do. Here’s the way you need to be able to work at it. Here’s the way you need to perceive cameras and how cameras see you. How you put your character out there and how you put your brand out there.

At the end of the day for us, characters are all about charisma. So that’s the thing you’re looking for the most. I see a lot of unbelievable athletes come through the Performance Center; sometimes they have charisma, sometimes they don’t.

I’ve hired a lot [of people] that have charisma, but aren’t necessarily the greatest athletes we saw that week because you just can’t take your eyes off of them.

For example, there’s a guy that I hired in China that everybody on the team who was over there didn’t put this kid on the list and when we went through the list at the end of the day of who we’re going to offer an opportunity to come and train with the WWE I was like, ‘Where’s this kid?’ and everyone was like, ‘You’re kidding, right?’

I was like, ‘No, where is he?’ He was heavy and a Mongolian wrestler, so he’s athletic but he’s heavier and in some ways he’s not anything we would look for, but he worked his butt off. He was always last, but he never quit man. He just went. Some guys would pull up with an injury and they’d go sit out. You could clearly tell that they were just gasping for air and needed to sit for a second. They’d be back ten minutes later.

He gutted through everything and you couldn’t take your eyes off of this guy. He did stuff that was funny, even though he didn’t mean for it to be that way. He was always the center of attention, even when he wasn’t doing anything!

Everyone was against him and I said ‘Is there anybody in this room who didn’t watch this guy the entire day? I’ve heard everyone talk about this guy. Why? He’s the sleeper money in this group.’

So we brought him [to the Performance Center] and there’s not a week goes by that somebody doesn’t send me a clip or a photo of him doing something where there’s 10 or 15 people around him watching. He’s just one of those naturally charismatic people that you can’t put your finger on why.

I look for that more than I look for anything else.

Is he ever going to do a moonsault? Probably not. Is he ever going to be a Shawn Michaels in the ring? I guarantee you he won’t. But, if he loves it, if he works hard and keeps himself straight, he’s probably going to make it and he’s probably going to be good.

That’s the biggest thing to me, the charisma factor.”

You kind of answered my next question, but I’ll ask it anyway. When you’re scouting someone, what do you specifically look for?

“Look, I mean there are other factors as well. I don’t want to make it sound like ‘Oh, look at this guy he has a big personality and forget all of the rest of it.’ Obviously athleticism, the willingness to do this, the desire to work hard, but then there’s leadership qualities that we really look for.

When guys go to a camp, sometimes people watch them and go, ‘You’re just making these people throw-up in garbage can because you’re working them so hard.’ I want to push them to where they’re really outside of their comfort range and then see what they do with it.

It’s really easy to be nice and be the perfect professional when you feel great, but when you’re on the verge of puking in barrel and you’re exhausted and there’s someone barking at you to do more and the guy next to you just fell on you because he’s at the same place you are, do you help pick him up or do you curse at him and go about your own business?

There are differences in how people react to things. I’m looking for leaders. I’m looking for someone that can be a professional. I’m looking for the consummate athlete on all aspects.

It’s not just one thing, but if you ask me the one thing I look for, charisma is king.”

Going back for a second to the guy that you were talking about in China; it seemed as though there was and still is a certain look that a talent needs in order to reach a certain level of success in WWE. Now, obviously there have been exceptions to the rule, but it seems like over the past few years you’ve bucked that trend. How did that transition happen?

“So, I’m a big believer in talent is talent. It comes in all shapes, sizes, looks, feels, everything. I think sometimes there’s been a bad rap of like take this as the thing that’s most successful, so that’s what we’re going to give.

I think that’s happen here in the past. People can say whatever about WWE and look, is there a particular style of athlete [we look for]? Sure, it’s like that in anything.

If you’re shown steak all of the time, it’s no surprise that you’re going to eat steak. So when everybody coming to you with the same look and feel, a certain pattern begins to develop because that’s what being put in front of you and that’s what you have to select from.

My selection process is different. Yes, I understand what Vince likes and what Vince sees in an ideal archetype performer, but I also know him well enough to know that he likes a lot of different archetypes, so I’m not going to give him one; I’m going to give him a little bit of everything.

He’s going to see a Bray Wyatt and go (Vince voice) ‘That’s great!’ He’s going to see a Braun Strowman and go ‘Ah yeah, that’s my wheelhouse right there. I love that.’ He’s going to see Finn Balor and hear the girls going nuts and then see the paint and go ‘Geez look at that, I love that!’ That’s something that I don’t think would have been put in front of him eight years ago.

I sometimes wonder if Bray Wyatt would have been put in front of him 10 years ago. I don’t know that he would of. That doesn’t mean that Vince wouldn’t have loved him back then.

I want there to be so much diversity on every level. I want it to be international diversity. I want there to be something for everybody within WWE so you can gravitate towards characters that you can relate to. That’s still a work in progress.

It’s a work in progress when you look at the Performance Center and you look at the talent there and see that 40 percent of the talent is international now, there’s 17 countries represented. A quarter of the talent there is women. The diversity level is at an all-time high and that’s on purpose. We’ve done that for desired effect.

Is it showing right now on the main roster? Nah, not necessarily because it’s going to take a little bit of time to percolate up, but it’s there.

I want that diversity. When you talk about the women, I want there to be a Sasha Banks; the smaller, run her mouth, cocky, arrogant, little athlete. I want there to be a bigger, dominant athlete like a Charlotte. I want there to be a Nia Jax that brings a whole different danger component. I want there to be a Bayley that is this naïve, fan-friendly, little girl centric character that everybody loves.

Then you still want there to be the Bellas, who are like the Kardashians of the women’s division. You want that variety.

It’s the same with the guys. I want there to be a Cena, I want there to be a Randy Orton. But I also want there to be a Bray Wyatt. I want there to be a Braun Strowman. I want there to be a Finn Balor. I want there to be a Samoa Joe or a Kevin Owens. Big Cass and then a little guy like Enzo that can run his mouth nonstop.

I want that diversity.”

As I looked at the WrestleMania card and noticed all of the former NXT stars, I thought about how much the roster has changed over the last year. There have been so many guys and girls that have gotten the call-up to the main roster, how challenging has it been to deal with such a major transition to NXT?

“So that’s been the most challenging thing for me in the last year. When we had the draft, 16 talents got called up. I started over with the women’s division. Thank God I kept Asuka because she’s been the anchor. My male division was pretty much stripped down. I lost a lot of it.

Behind the scenes, the same thing happened. My executive producer that works with me on the show got called up. I got a new one; he made it two weeks before he got called up.

I lost my edit team that helped me get the feel and the look of the brand because they got called up. I was thrilled for them. They were so good that the office said, ‘Look we’re expanding, we’re going to do 205, we’re going to do this, we’re going to do that. We need these people.’

I’m very hands on with the writing of NXT and the team that was writing NXT with me got called up. When we split the brands, we needed a different writing team and they got called up.

So I started over with this whole new team and they needed to get their feet on the ground. It was really a brand new start over point for us. That’s challenging, but that’s also to me part of the strength of NXT. It’ll change, but it’ll be fresh and it’ll be different than it was a year ago. I’m not saying it’s always going to be better, but it’ll be different.

I just got a whole new behind the scenes team and it’s taken me since SummerSlam to get them, but I just got them and I’m really excited about it. I feel like for the first time since the draft, NXT is back in business and we’re going to rock and roll.

I’m looking forward to NXT constantly keeping us on our toes and the demand for more and more on the main roster, the demand for more and more shows, whether that is localized content in the UK, or the cruiserweight division or the women’s tournament that we’ll have coming up sometime this year.

All of those things are exciting opportunities and make NXT an exciting opportunity.”

Can you describe what it feels like to see a talent that has had success in NXT, but struggles to find their footing on the main roster?

“It’s hard for me. It’s hard for them. It’s a difficult situation. I say this to talent all of the time, careers are marathons, they are not sprints.

Even though we say it’s a third brand, it really is and you might never make it out of NXT and you’ll do really well in your career, but if you do get the chance to go to Raw or SmackDown, it’s like starting over. You’re starting over with new management and new everything. The job is the same, but you’re starting over and you have to re-earn your stripes. It’s a slightly different product.

It used to be that way in the territory days. You might be over in one territory and take the gamble to go to another territory and sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t.

It can be frustrating for them. They ask a lot of questions and we try to give them as much guidance as we can.

The other thing though that everybody has to remember is that in today’s world if you’re not “The Guy or The Girl” at the very top, the number one draw, you can still be a talent on Raw or SmackDown and working all of the time and be doing very, very well for yourself.

Do you always want more? Yes. Will that come over time? Maybe.

You reinvent yourself, you work hard. You continue to do the things you’re doing.

Back to the career being a marathon and not a sprint; when you’re a few years in, being on Raw or SmackDown and you’ve only been in the business for four years or whatever, it’s not a bad place to be.

If two years down the line you get that ride up to a much higher level, it’s a pretty good run.”

Twitter: @ScottDargis

WWE’s Bayley: Facing Stephanie McMahon would be a ‘dream’ match

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Even though Bayley made her main roster debut back in late-August, she’s quickly become one of the biggest fan-favorites on the main roster. Before she defends her Raw Women’s Championship at WrestleMania, Sunday, April 2 at 7pm ET live on WWE Network, I had the chance to chat with Ms. Hug Life about her extra time in NXT, if she asked for any advice from The Rock and her dream opponent. 

Me: While three of the “Four Horsewomen” were called up to the main roster, you stayed down in NXT. Do you think you needed the extra time in developmental?

Bayley: “Yeah, now looking back I definitely did. At the time obviously I was like what about me? I’m ready, let’s go! I wanted to do everything that they did. Now looking back, I think that has been the most important year of my career. I look back and think I wasn’t ready. I was so dependent on them throughout my years in NXT. If something went wrong, I always had them, but the year without them was all on me.

The whole division relied on me, everybody came to me for advice. If something went wrong, it was my fault. I really needed that leadership to build confidence in myself. In the future if I’m the leader for the locker room in WWE, I know that I can handle it. I was able to work with girls that have never been in a wrestling ring with before, girls who were just getting started, and girls who have been doing it forever like Asuka.

It was the most important year and maybe one of the most fun years I’ve had.”

You’ve been on the road with the main roster for seven months now; do you find yourself still adjusting to what life is like on the main roster?

“A little bit … the actual backstage and being in WWE was easy because in NXT the coaches and Triple H had prepared us for what to expect. That’s what the Performance Center is for, from doing promo class, to being in the ring for hours, to watching your matches back.

It’s the traveling and not being able to see my dog every day when I get home (laughs) that’s a little bit harder to deal with. I don’t think I’ll ever get used to that, but it’s all worth it though.

The brands are split right now; I can’t imagine what it would have been like to do two TV [tapings] every week.”

What’s the first word that comes to mind when you think about winning the Raw Women’s Championship?

“Oh man … just unbelievable. I just didn’t expect all of that to happen so fast.”

Obviously you’re a lifelong fan and I’m sure you envisioned that moment happening, so what went through your mind as you stood there with the title, in the ring, in front of thousands of people?

“I wish my family was there. That was the first thing that I thought about. My mom always says, you have a title match, should I be there? She was at every single NXT title match because she never knew if that was going to be the night. I just knew that she was going to be so mad that she wasn’t there.I knew they were watching.

I was in the Cow Palace when Eddie Guerrero won his first [world] title. I felt like I knew him and was so happy for him. I remember him jumping into the crowd and the crowd being so happy and then I did that and I just had that vision in my mind. It was weird! The crowd just made it more special considering my family wasn’t there. It was just amazing.

Did The Rock give you any advice when you met him?

“He told me that he watches and said you’re the champion so you must be doing something right. I was like, yeah I guess so. I didn’t want to take up too much of his time. He said that he really enjoys watching. I hope he wasn’t just saying that to be nice though.”

Recently you’ve been paired on television with Stephanie McMahon quite a bit and she plays a character that rarely gets one-upped by a babyface. Have you thought about Bayley-Steph in the same way that “Stone Cold” Steve Austin had Vince McMahon?

“I’ve thought about that so many times. Even when I was a kid (laughs). When she was having matches with Lita, I was like I want to have matches with Stephanie one day. That’s one of my dream matches to be honest.

If it could continue on, like you said with Austin and Vince, that would be so much fun, but I’m sure it’s a little much to ask for right now.”

Do you find yourself putting extra pressure on your shoulders because you’re the champ going into WrestleMania?

“Yeah totally. I’m probably doing way too much. Leading up to it I’m just stressing myself out. Do I need to get into the gym three times a day and try to still make everyone happy by doing all of these things that I need to do? I don’t even really know how to prepare for Mania, so I’m just doing what I think I need to do and I might be doing too much.

I think once I get to Orlando and I can digest what’s actually happening and appreciate it and know like holy crap dude, you’re here, then I’ll be able to calm down a bit. Right now, I have to be over-prepared.”

Twitter: @ScottDargis