Cotto-Alvarez bout is on for Nov. 21 after tough negotiation

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LOS ANGELES (AP) If Miguel Cotto’s fight with Saul “Canelo” Alvarez is anywhere near as difficult as the negotiations to get them in the ring together, boxing fans are in for a treat this fall.

After months of strenuous posturing and painstaking discussions, Cotto and Alvarez appeared together in Hollywood on Monday to formally announce their WBC middleweight title bout, set for Nov. 21 at the Mandalay Bay Events Center in Las Vegas.

The fight pits two of the sport’s biggest names in a long-awaited chapter of Puerto Rico’s long-standing boxing rivalry with Mexico. They have circled each other for years, and the negotiations dragged on for so long that both boxers took other fights earlier this year.

But both fighters are grateful the contracts are finally signed for a landmark night.

“Like any big fight, the negotiations are going to be hard,” Alvarez said through a translator. “But I’m honored to fight a guy with his accomplishments. This is a big step in my career.”

Alvarez (45-1-1, 32 KOs) had a predictably large fan contingent behind him during their public appearance in Hollywood, and the 25-year-old Mexican star is favored by most oddsmakers against the 34-year-old Cotto (40-4, 33 KOs).

Alvarez’s fans booed Cotto and his camp repeatedly during their news conference. They even jeered beloved trainer Freddie Roach when he predicted Cotto will win by a knockout.

“I don’t know what people say about the fight, and I don’t care,” Cotto said. “I focus on myself, on my training camp. Nothing else matters.”

Tickets go on sale Tuesday morning, but they will be brutally scarce for the smallish Mandalay Bay arena, which doesn’t hold nearly as many fans as the MGM Grand Garden, Madison Square Garden, an outdoor Texas stadium or any other location seriously considered for this bout. Alvarez’s camp wanted the fight in Texas, where Alvarez drew 31,588 Houston fans to watch his stoppage of James Kirkland earlier this year.

Alvarez’s camp was careful not to assign too much public blame for the torturous negotiations to Cotto, a famously deliberate decision-maker, and his new promoters at Roc Nation Sports.

“Let’s put it this way – it was quite interesting, the negotiation,” said Oscar De La Hoya, Alvarez’s promoter at Golden Boy. “But it was fun, because we all wanted the same thing. This is one of the most anticipated matchups in several years, so we all had one goal, and we eventually got there.”

Cotto’s promoters say he’ll be fighting for the biggest purse of a decorated career that includes world titles in four weight classes, a first for a Puerto Rican fighter. He became the WBC’s middleweight champion in June 2014 by beating Sergio Martinez, but is undersized for the weight class.

Alvarez also has never fought as a true middleweight, and they’ll fight each other at a 155-pound catch weight, barely above the super welterweight limit.

Cotto has revitalized his career under Roach, who cut down on Cotto’s heavy cardio work and focused him on workouts designed to keep him fresh.

“Negotiations were tough because you’ve got two fighters who want to be the `A’ side,” Roach said. “We’ve got the title, and he’s got plenty of things on his side. It was a hard negotiation to get through, because everybody wants an edge.”

Still, Roach said he is thrilled the deal got made because “this is the fight I wanted really bad, that I’ve been dreaming about for Miguel.” Roach is confident Cotto’s toughness and veteran skill, coupled with the trainer’s game plan, will allow him to upset Alvarez, whose punching power has been too much for anyone except Floyd Mayweather Jr.

Cotto and Alvarez have both lost fights to Mayweather, and both would welcome a rematch with the pound-for-pound king of boxing in 2016. They also realize the WBC has ordered the winner of their bout to fight the winner of WBC interim middleweight champion Gennady Golovkin’s October pay-per-view showdown with David Lemieux, or be stripped of the title they worked so hard to win.

“I’m only focused on this fight, on this day,” Cotto said. “Everything after that does not matter. It’s a big fight, but it’s just another fight, and I’m going to be the winner.”

Boxer LaMotta, immortalized in ‘Raging Bull,’ dies at 95

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MIAMI (AP) Jake LaMotta, the former middleweight champion whose life was depicted in the film “Raging Bull,” has died at the age of 95.

His fiancee, Denise Baker, says LaMotta died Tuesday at a Miami-area hospital from complications of pneumonia.

The Bronx Bull, as he was known in his fighting days, compiled an 83-19-4 record with 30 knockouts.

LaMotta fought Sugar Ray Robinson six times, handing Robinson his first defeat. He lost the middleweight title to him in what became known as the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre.

In his previous fight, LaMotta saved the championship in movie-script fashion against Laurent Dauthuille. Trailing badly, LaMotta knocked out the challenger with 13 seconds left.

LaMotta threw a fight against Billy Fox, which he admitted in testimony before a U.S. Senate committee. He said he was promised a shot at a title.

On June 16, 1949, he became middleweight champion when Marcel Cerdan couldn’t continue after the 10th round.

The 1980 film “Raging Bull” was based on LaMotta’s memoir. Actor Robert DeNiro won an Academy Award for it.

Canelo and Golovkin fight to controversial draw

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LAS VEGAS (AP) — Gennady Golovkin retained his middleweight titles Saturday night, fighting to a draw with Canelo Alvarez in a brutal battle that ended with both fighters with their hands aloft in victory.

The middleweight showdown lived up to its hype as the two fighters traded huge punches and went after each other for 12 rounds. Neither fighter was down and neither appeared seriously hurt but both landed some huge punches to the head that had the crowd screaming in excitement.

Golovkin was the aggressor throughout and landed punches that had put other fighters to the canvas. But he couldn’t put Alvarez down, and the Mexican star more than stood his own in exchanges with Triple G, from Kazakhstan. The two were still brawling as the final seconds ticked down and the fight went to the scorecards.

One judge had Alvarez winning 118-110, a second had it 115-113 in Golovkin’s favor while the third had it 114-114. The Associated Press scored it 114-114.

Golovkin, who has never lost in 38 fights, retained his middleweight titles with the draw. But Alvarez showed that he could not only take Golovkin’s punches but land telling punches of his own.

A frenzied crowd of 22,358 at the T-Mobile Arena roared throughout the fight as the two middleweights put on the kind of show that boxing purists had anticipated. They brawled, used sharp jabs and counter-punched at times, with neither one willing to give the other much ground.

“Congratulations all my friends from Mexico,” Golovkin said. “I want a true fight. I want a big drama show.”

There was plenty of drama late in the fight as Alvarez seemed to rally and rocked Golovkin with uppercuts and big right hands. But just as soon as he landed he often took one back from the slugger so feared that most other fighter avoided him.

“I won seven-eight rounds easily,” Alvarez said.

It was a battle from the opening bell as Golovkin tried to walk Alvarez down but often found himself getting hit from sharp counter punches.

“Today, people give me draw. I focus on boxing,” Golovkin said. “Look my belts, I’m still champion. I’ve not lost.”

Golovkin predicted before the fight that the late rounds would resemble a street fight, and in a way they did. Both fighters were willing to trade, and both had no problems landing hard shots to the head.

Golovkin had chased Alvarez for nearly two years, trying to get the signature fight that would pay him millions and make him a pay-per-view draw on his own. Alvarez finally agreed after Golovkin looked vulnerable earlier this year against Daniel Jacobs in a decision win that stopped his knockout streak at 23 fights.